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Mucosal and salivary microbiota associated with recurrent aphthous stomatitis

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dc.contributor.authorKim, Yun-ji-
dc.contributor.authorChoi, Yun Sik-
dc.contributor.authorBaek, Keum Jin-
dc.contributor.authorYoon, Seok-Hwan-
dc.contributor.authorPark, Hee Kyung-
dc.contributor.authorChoi, Youngnim-
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-09T00:37:32Z-
dc.date.available2017-02-09T00:37:32Z-
dc.date.issued2016-04-01-
dc.identifier.citationBMC Microbiology, 16(1):57ko_KR
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10371/100565-
dc.descriptionThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0
International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and
reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to
the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
ko_KR
dc.description.abstractAbstract

Background
Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a common oral mucosal disorder of unclear etiopathogenesis. Although recent studies of the oral microbiota by high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes have suggested that imbalances in the oral microbiota may contribute to the etiopathogenesis of RAS, no specific bacterial species associated with RAS have been identified. The present study aimed to characterize the microbiota in the oral mucosa and saliva of RAS patients in comparison with control subjects at the species level.


Results
The bacterial communities of the oral mucosa and saliva from RAS patients with active lesions (RAS, n = 18 for mucosa and n = 8 for saliva) and control subjects (n = 18 for mucosa and n = 7 for saliva) were analyzed by pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes. There were no significant differences in the alpha diversity between the controls and the RAS, but the mucosal microbiota of the RAS patients showed increased inter-subject variability. A comparison of the relative abundance of each taxon revealed decreases in the members of healthy core microbiota but increases of rare species in the mucosal and salivary microbiota of RAS patients. Particularly, decreased Streptococcus salivarius and increased Acinetobacter johnsonii in the mucosa were associated with RAS risk. A dysbiosis index, which was developed using the relative abundance of A. johnsonii and S. salivarius and the regression coefficients, correctly predicted 83 % of the total cases for the absence or presence of RAS. Interestingly, A. johnsonii substantially inhibited the proliferation of gingival epithelial cells and showed greater cytotoxicity against the gingival epithelial cells than S. salivarius.



Conclusion
RAS is associated with dysbiosis of the mucosal and salivary microbiota, and two species associated with RAS have been identified. This knowledge may provide a diagnostic tool and new targets for therapeutics for RAS.
ko_KR
dc.language.isoenko_KR
dc.publisherBioMed Centralko_KR
dc.subjectRecurrent aphthous stomatitisko_KR
dc.subjectOral microbiotako_KR
dc.subjectPyrosequencingko_KR
dc.titleMucosal and salivary microbiota associated with recurrent aphthous stomatitisko_KR
dc.typeArticleko_KR
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor김윤지-
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor최윤식-
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor백금진-
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor윤석환-
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor박희경-
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor최영님-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12866-016-0673-z-
dc.language.rfc3066en-
dc.rights.holderKim et al.-
dc.date.updated2017-01-06T10:18:05Z-
Appears in Collections:
College of Dentistry/School of Dentistry (치과대학/치의학대학원)Dept. of Dentistry (치의학과)Journal Papers (저널논문_치의학과)
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