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Greater body mass index is related to greater self-identified cold tolerance and greater insensible body mass loss

Cited 2 time in Web of Science Cited 2 time in Scopus
Authors
Jung, Dahee; Kim, Dami; Park, Joonhee; Lee, Joo Young
Issue Date
2016-08-22
Publisher
BioMed Central
Citation
Journal of Physiological Anthropology, 35(1):16
Keywords
Insensible perspirationInsensible body mass loss,Thermal toleranceBody mass indexBody weightPsychological polymorphism
Abstract
Background
Insensible body mass loss (IBL) from the human body continuously occurs, which is an important component in body heat exchange. The purpose of this study was to examine the relevance of IBL to anthropometric characteristics and self-identified thermal tolerance.

Methods
A total of 289 healthy young Korean males were chosen and sorted into the following three groups: heat tolerable only (HTO, N = 79), cold tolerable only (CTO, N = 104), neither heat nor cold tolerable (NHC, N = 106). They weighed before and after a 30-min rest under lightly clothed condition at an air temperature of 23 ± 1 °C with a relative humidity 55 ± 5 %RH.

Results
(1) The IBL of 289 males had a mean of 90 ± 75 g h−1 (48 ± 40 g h−1 m−2); (2) No significant difference in IBL among the three groups were found; (3) Significant differences in body weight and body mass index (BMI) among three groups were found (P < 0.05), but insignificance was found for height (P = 0.726) or body surface area (P = 0.059); (4) CTO was approximately 4.1 kg heavier in body weight (P < 0.05) and higher in BMI (P < 0.01) than in HTO; (5) Only for the group CTO, IBL (g h−1) showed a positive relationship to BMI (P < 0.05, R
2 = 0.056), but there was no relationship between IBL and body surface area.

Conclusions
For healthy young males within normal anthropometric ranges in Korea, IBL was positively related to BMI, and individuals with greater BMI showed greater self-identified cold tolerance, but no direct relationship was found between IBL and self-identified cold tolerance. This suggests that body physique (e.g., BMI) could be an explanatory factor between insensible body heat loss and subjective cognition on cold tolerance.
Language
English
URI
https://hdl.handle.net/10371/109995
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1186/s40101-016-0105-7
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College of Human Ecology (생활과학대학)Dept. of Textiles, Merchandising and Fashion Design (의류학과)Journal Papers (저널논문_의류학과)
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