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Retroperitoneal Laparoscopy in Dogs: Access Technique, Working Space, and Surgical Anatomy

Cited 5 time in Web of Science Cited 5 time in Scopus
Authors
Jeong, Junemoe; Ko, Jonghyeok; Lim, Hyunjoo; Kweon, Oh-Kyeong; Kim, Wan Hee
Issue Date
2016-11
Publisher
WILEY-BLACKWELL
Citation
VETERINARY SURGERY Vol.45 No.1, pp. 102-110
Keywords
Retroperitoneal Laparoscopy in Dogs: Access Technique, Working Space, and Surgical Anatomy의약학
Abstract
Objective: To develop and describe a laparoscopic retroperitoneal access technique, investigate working space establishment, and describe the surgical anatomy in the retroperitoneal space as an initial step for clinical application of retroperitoneal laparoscopy in dogs.
Study Design: Cadaveric and experimental study. Animals: Cadaveric (n58) and healthy (n56) adult dogs.
Methods: The retroperitoneal access technique was developed in 3 cadavers based on the human technique and transperitoneal observation. Its application and working space establishment with carbon dioxide (CO2) insufflation alone was evaluated in 5 cadavers by observing with a transperitoneal telescope and in 6 live dogs by repeated computed tomography (CT) scans at pressure of 0, 5, 10, and 15 mmHg. Recordings of retroperitoneoscopy as well as working space volume and linear dimensions measured on CT images were analyzed.
Results: Retroperitoneal access and working space establishment with CO2 insufflation alone were successfully performed in all 6 live dogs. The only complication observed was in 1 dog that developed subclinical pneumomediastinum. As pressure increased, working space was established from the ipsilateral to the contralateral side, and peritoneal tearing eventually developed. Working space volume increased significantly from 5 mmHg and linear dimensions increased significantly from 0 to 10 mmHg. With pneumo-retroperitoneum above 5 mmHg, retroperitoneal organs, including kidneys and adrenal glands, were easily visualized.
Conclusion: The retroperitoneal access technique and working space establishment with CO2 insufflation starting with 5 mmHg and increasing to 10 mmHg provided adequate working space and visualization of retroperitoneal organs, which may allow direct access for retroperitoneal laparoscopy in dogs.
ISSN
0161-3499
Language
English
URI
https://hdl.handle.net/10371/116938
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1111/vsu.12571
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College of Veterinary Medicine (수의과대학)Dept. of Veterinary Medicine (수의학과)Journal Papers (저널논문_수의학과)
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