Browse

A multifaceted framework toward implementation behavior and innovation outcome: Interactive effects of innovation characteristics and individual, social, and organizational factors
개인, 사회, 조직, 그리고 혁신의 특성이 혁신실행 행위와 결과에 미치는 영향에 관한 연구

Cited 0 time in Web of Science Cited 0 time in Scopus
Authors
정구혁
Advisor
최진남
Major
경영대학 경영학과
Issue Date
2015-02
Publisher
서울대학교 대학원
Keywords
Innovation implementationMcClelland’s Need Theorycompliancecooperationchampioninginnovation outcome
Description
학위논문 (박사)-- 서울대학교 대학원 : 경영학과, 2015. 2. 최진남.
Abstract
Recently, technological advancement and growth in cross–border trade
have accelerated future uncertainties, and thus contemporary organizations have
set managing innovation–related activities as one of their top priorities. To this
end, a large body of research has examined the nature of innovation, but many
studies on innovation remained limited. In contrast to the previous research
stream grounded on a bifurcated user behavior model of either acceptance or
rejection, this study first attempted to develop a multifaceted framework of
individual need and implementation behavior toward innovation.
Specifically, I began with McClellands Need Theory and hypothesized
three relationships between each need (i.e., need for achievement, affiliation, and
power) and a corresponding behavior toward innovation (i.e., compliance,
cooperation, and championing). Afterwards, drawing on the person–situation–
behavior (P–S–B) triad long–established in the personality psychology literature,
I postulated that an innovation property (i.e., performance expectancy), social
factors (i.e., social expectation), and an organizational factor (i.e., participatory practice) would moderate each relationship. Finally, I supposed that three forms
of implementation behavior would lead to innovation outcome, an individuals
gains from using the innovation.
To test my multifaceted framework of individual implementation
behavior toward innovation, I collected survey data of 302 individuals from 11
organizations in Korea. The results showed that, as expected, n affiliation was
positively related to cooperation and n power was negatively related to
championing, but that unexpectedly, n achievement was negatively associated
with compliance. In addition, each implementation behavior led to innovation
outcome. Although only one of the interaction hypotheses was supported, the
post hoc analysis identified three cross–interactions: the interaction effect of
social expectation on the n achievement–championing relationship
the
interaction effect of performance expectancy on the n affiliation–cooperation
relationship
and the interaction effect of social expectation on the n affiliation–
championing relationship.
The present study provided theoretically meaningful contributions. First,
this new model of individual–level implementation process offered a more
balanced view by integrating an innovation property, a social factor, an
organizational factor, and individual factors into one framework. In particular,
the application of Trait Activation Theory to the innovation literature evoked the
effect of social expectation as the strongest situation directing employee need to
the utmost implementation behavior. Second, this research firstly elucidated the
multiple forms of implementation behavior, namely, compliance, cooperation,
and championing. Finally, this study conceptually singled out and empirically
tested three different paths from employee need to implementation behavior.
Furthermore, the present research firstly examined the form of implementation
behavior that leads to the highest innovation outcome, to my knowledge.
This research also suggested several practical implications. The
compliant behavior of employees on innovation requirements was a crucial
predictor of innovation outcome. However, if management would like to
improve organizational effectiveness, it should also derive the cooperation and
championing behaviors of employees in using innovation. Management should
especially highlight the finding that, given a strong social expectation, those with
n affiliation can also conduct championing. In other words, to achieve a higher
level of innovation outcome, managers should not only leave employees with n
affiliation to perform cooperation, but they should also encourage employees to
conduct championing toward innovation by helping them shape strong social
expectation.
In summary, a multifaceted perspective of the individual–level process of
innovation implementation can provide contemporary organizations with
effective ways to gain expected and extended benefits from using innovation.
With this new framework, organizations can obtain a higher level of
organizational effectiveness and ultimately accomplish the goal of future
survival.
Language
English
URI
https://hdl.handle.net/10371/119366
Files in This Item:
Appears in Collections:
College of Business Administration/Business School (경영대학/대학원)Dept. of Business Administration (경영학과)Theses (Ph.D. / Sc.D._경영학과)
  • mendeley

Items in S-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Browse