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Phylogenetic relationship of Korean Phragmites japonica Based on Phenotypic and EST-SSR marker analyses

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Authors
김다솜
Advisor
김도순
Major
농업생명과학대학 식물생산과학부
Issue Date
2017-02
Publisher
서울대학교 대학원
Keywords
EST-SSR markergenetic diversityPhenotypic markerPhragmites japonicaPhylogenetic relationshipRunner reed
Description
학위논문 (석사)-- 서울대학교 대학원 : 식물생산과학부, 2017. 2. 김도순.
Abstract
Phragmites japonica has been considered as a weed because of their unplanned growth. However, Phragmites species has useful traits such as pollutant absorbing traits which make this species a multifunctional plant rather than just a weed. Moreover, Korea is the main habitat of P. japonica which is mainly distributed in the Northeast Asian region. Considering the worth as a multifunctional plant and biological resource, P. japonica is worth conserving as a national biological resource of Korea. For the conservation of this species, taxonomic identification and classification using phenotypic and genetic markers are essential, but little effort has been made so far for this purpose and for investigating its phylogenetic relationship with other Phragmites species and within P. japonica. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate the phylogenetic relationship of Korean P. japonica using phenotypic and EST-SSR markers. From Korea and neighboring countries, Russia and China, 101 Phragmites japonica accessions and 8 Phragmites australis accessions were collected in 2014 and 2015. Analyses with 13 phenotypic markers and 10 EST-SSR markers clearly clustered Phragmites accessions into two Phragmites species groups, P. japonica and P. australis. In phenotypic marker analyses, presence and absence of ligule hair and leaf sheath hair, and the ratio of the 1st glume and the lowest lemma length were key markers to distinguish between P. japonica and P. australis. Accessions of P. japonica were then clustered into two groups
Group I and II. Floret number is a major phenotypic marker to distinguish Group I from Group II. Each Group had two sub-groups, which were clustered by stem color and leaf cross section. In EST-SSR markers analyses, P. japonica was clustered into 2 groups, Group I and Group II, and Group I was further divided into two subgroups, Group IA and Group IB. Accessions belonging to Group IA were mainly distributed in the marginal regions of the Korean peninsula, while those in Group IB were mainly distributed in the central part of the Korean Peninsula and Jeonnam province. Although no single EST-SSR marker was able to distinguish between Phragmites species, multiple EST-SSR markers were able to distinguish P. japonica from P. australis. In summary, our results demonstrate that phenotypic markers and EST-SSR markers are useful tools for distinguishing between two Phragmites species and evaluating their phylogenetic relationship and genetic diversity although it was difficult to see consensus between two markers due to lack of number of markers evaluated in this study. The phylogenetic trees established by phenotypic marker and EST-SSR marker analyses also demonstrated the genetic diversity of Korean P. japonica.
Language
English
URI
https://hdl.handle.net/10371/125619
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College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (농업생명과학대학)Dept. of Plant Science (식물생산과학부)Theses (Master's Degree_식물생산과학부)
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