Browse

Comparison of upper airway patency in patients with mild obstructive sleep apnea during dexmedetomidine or propofol sedation: a prospective, randomized, controlled trial

Cited 2 time in Web of Science Cited 3 time in Scopus
Authors
Shin, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Eun-Young; Hwang, Jung-Won; Do, Sang-Hwan; Na, Hyo-Seok
Issue Date
2018-09-05
Publisher
BioMed Central
Citation
BMC Anesthesiology, 18(1):120
Keywords
DexmedetomidineObstructive sleep apneaPropofolSedation
Abstract
Background
In addition to propofol, dexmedetomidine is a suitable alternative for intraoperative sedation in procedures requiring regional anesthesia. To date, however, little is known about the influences of each drug on upper airway patency. Accordingly, the authors investigated differences between dexmedetomidine and propofol sedation in the occurrence of upper airway obstruction and requirements for airway intervention in patients with mild obstructive sleep apnea.

Methods
Patients with an apnea/hypopnea index of 5–14/h according to Watch-PAT 200 analysis were enrolled in this study. Spinal anesthesia was routinely performed for surgery. Intraoperative sedation was initiated using either dexmedetomidine or propofol infusion at a level of modified observers assessment of alertness/sedation scale 3. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients exhibiting signs of upper airway obstruction. A sign of upper airway obstruction was defined as no detection of end-tidal carbon dioxide for at least 10 s despite respiratory efforts.

Results
A total of 50 patients were included in the final analysis (dexmedetomidine [n = 26]; propofol [n = 24]). During the intraoperative sedation period, there was a significantly lower proportion of patients exhibiting signs of upper airway obstruction in the dexmedetomidine group than in the propofol group (11.5% vs. 41.7%, P = 0.035). An artificial airway was inserted in 1 patients (3.8%) and 5 patient (20.8%) in the dexmedetomidine and propofol groups, respectively (P = 0.093).

Conclusion
Dexmedetomidine sedation was associated with a lower incidence of upper airway obstruction than propofol sedation in patients with mild obstructive sleep apnea.

Trial registration number
Clinical trials.gov (
NCT02993718

): Retrospectively registered.
ISSN
1471-2253
Language
English
URI
https://hdl.handle.net/10371/143547
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1186/s12871-018-0586-5
Files in This Item:
Appears in Collections:
College of Medicine/School of Medicine (의과대학/대학원)Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine (마취통증의학전공)Journal Papers (저널논문_마취통증의학전공)
  • mendeley

Items in S-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Browse