Browse

유휴 산업시설에서 탄생한 전시 공간

Cited 0 time in Web of Science Cited 0 time in Scopus
Authors
서수진
Advisor
김정희
Major
미술대학 협동과정미술경영
Issue Date
2019-02
Publisher
서울대학교 대학원
Description
학위논문 (석사)-- 서울대학교 대학원 : 미술대학 협동과정미술경영, 2019. 2. 김정희.
Abstract
This study examines the backgrounds and examples of art exhibition spaces created by converting abandoned industrial facilities. Repurposing idle buildings for other usages is a distinct architectural method that not only repairs physical aspects of old buildings but also changes the function of the building. This type of building conversion has been commonly utilized since the 1970s which is when this architectural style was first recognized for its value and gained popularity as a building practice, but initial examples can be found even in the ancient Roman Empire.
Constructed from the first century through the Roman Empire, the amphitheater is the place where various violent and spectacular ancient sports competitions were held. From the third century, however, as the Roman Empire faced a military, political, and economic crisis, it became increasingly difficult to hold sporting events. In addition, violent Roman sports games also faced continued oppositions from Stoic and Christian factions. Eventually, some sports events were banned in the fifth century, and by the sixth century, most amphitheaters lost their function as all sports games had ceased.
The amphitheater was then destroyed to recycle building materials or adapted for other uses. Some of the amphitheaters were converted into public execution spots or churches but most of them were converted into fortifications against foreign invasions. The fortified amphitheater was remodeled into a structure in which a residential building was built with many of the old entrances reinforced or blocked. Some of the remaining Roman amphitheaters are currently being used as performance halls and a gymnasiums.
Other examples of buildings that have not been repurposed include church buildings. Because church buildings tend to have not only excellent architectural quality but also religious, cultural and artistic values, when the buildings lost their religious functions, they were often reused for other purposes rather than being destroyed or dismantled.
Church buildings in medieval Europe went through many changes over the course of the religious reformation. Unlike other parts of Europe, the English Reformation in the sixteenth century had the nature of royal family-led religious repression. The British royal family and the Pope disbanded many monasteries in the fourteenth century, with an aim of boosting financial resources and political power. As a consequence, approximately 800 monasteries around England and Wales dissolved during the reign of King Henry VIII. The disbanded monasteries were either destroyed to reuse construction materials or were converted into mansions or fortresses.
The church buildings were also remodeled to accommodate new doctrines in northern and eastern European countries influenced by the Reformation movement initiated by Martin Luther in 1517. As the preacher's sermon, which conveys the word of Christ, became the most important aspect of the religion, splendid decorations inside and outside churches disappeared and pews and a pulpits started to appear in churches.
Since the twentieth century, church buildings were increasingly converted for other purposes. Peoples attitudes toward religion changed and religious sects decreased. Small churches in regions where the population continued to decline or residents moved to a nearby suburb were also affected by the decline in the number of believers. As such, churches experienced financial difficulties and sold their buildings to other organizations.
There have been a variety of discussions about acceptable methods and uses of abandoned church buildings because not only the physical aspects of church buildings but also their religious contexts should be considered. Since church functions as a public building for local communities, the argument that the church buildings should be used for public or cultural purposes is prevalent. Examples of converting church buildings for cultural purposes include Trust Theatre in Amsterdam, McColl Center for Art & Innovation in North Carolina, and Karré Saine Anne in Montpellier, France.
Recently, however, more and more church buildings are being converted into private or commercial uses regardless of the sect. The Lancaster Gate Church in London has been converted to an apartment named Spire House, a church in Limburg, Belgium has been converted to an architectural office, and a church in Maastricht, Netherlands has been converted to a hotel. Even if the church buildings are converted for commercial use, however, it is still considered important to ensure that it is done so in a way that respects the accessibility of residents and the city's image.
The trend of converting abandoned industrial buildings into exhibition spaces was first seen in the de-industrialized cities since the 1970s. As the Industrial Revolution began in England in the 1750s and 60s, many industrial buildings were built in major European and American cities, including resource storage and transportation facilities, modern factories, and power plants for mass production. From the beginning of the 20th century, cities started experiencing deindustrialization as the industrial structures shifted from manufacturing industries to service industries. For example, many mining facilities began to shut down as the main fuel sources changed from coal to oil and natural gas. Factories, warehouses and power plants also moved to other countries where rent and labor costs were relatively low. In addition, railways and port facilities built in the early stages of industrialization also became obsolete.
Factors that contributed to the reuse of abandoned and neglected idle industrial facilities for cultural purposes include sociocultural, environmental, architecture-historical, and art-historical components. The first factor was the shift in views on idle industrial facilities in 1970s from useless buildings to historical buildings that needed to be preserved. Specifically, the International Conference on the Convention of the Industrial Heritage (TICCIH) in 1973 began to use the term 'Industrial Heritage' and it was suggested that industrial facilities were not only important tangible assets in construction, and design of buildings, but also historically valuable for the industrial era. This view has led to a movement to preserve or reuse abandoned industrial buildings rather than destroying them.
The second factor contributing to the reuse of abandoned industrial buildings for cultural purposes is the rise in awareness of environmental and resource shortage problems. As international communities started to discuss the impacts and the problems of industrial activities over the past 200 years, it was perceived as wasteful to build new buildings, and thus the use of existing buildings began gain traction.
The third factor is the influence of post-modern architecture that emerged in the 1960s. The post-modern architecture that considered that history of the past, tradition, and region as important to society emerged against the modern architecture and urban planning that solely pursued functionality and efficiency. This shift in architecture philosophy became another reason for the rise in attention to the adaptive use of existing buildings.
The fourth factor includes the expansion in structure, material, and presentation of art work. In 1960s and 70s, art works that utilized novel patterns and materials began to emerge from the traditional sculptures and paintings. These newly emerging forms of art included large scale art works that went beyond the proportion of human body, installation art works that required large exhibition space, and art works that used materials scattered around like sand or pollutes the exhibition space like lead or fat. These art works were better when displayed in large, rough spaces as compared to white, clean exhibition halls that were divided into smaller rooms. As such, many industrial buildings that offered large, rough spaces started to be converted into exhibition spaces.
The first type of exhibition spaces were created by converting factories and warehouses. Many factories and warehouses were built in industrial cities from the 18th century to late 20th century. Since de-industrialization, the buildings became idle and some of the remaining buildings were converted into exhibition spaces. Examples of converting factories and warehouses include the Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art in Britain, Aduwig Forum for För Internationale Kunst in German, Hallen für Neue Kunst in Schaffhausen, Switzerland, and Musée d'Art Contemporain de Bordeaux in France, Dia, Mattress Factory, The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA, and Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art in America.
The second type of exhibition spaces were created by reusing railway stations and port facilities. Railway stations and port facilities were also major industrial facilities built during the period of active industrialization. Many railway stations and port facilities were built along the coast given the ease of exporting goods and richness in raw materials. Railway stations and port facilities, however, gradually deteriorated and become idle due to the decrease in activities of related industries or the development of new transportation systems. Examples of converting these deteriorated railway stations and idle port facilities into exhibition spaces include the Musée d'Orsay in France, the Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum of Hamburg-Museum für Gewenwart in Germany, Carrigeworks in Australia, and Tate Liverpool in the UK.
The third type of exhibition spaces were art districts where various cultural and artistic spaces were conglomerated. These art districts were often created by reconstructing industrial clusters. As industries developed, industrial clusters were formed in major cities to promote the synergies created by conglomeration of related industries and institutions in one place. However, as the secondary industry declined, industrial clusters became large-scale abandoned places. Artists looking for cheap work places voluntarily gathered in these regions to form an art district. Public policy makers also attempted to regenerate a wide range of declining regions by creating a cultural zone. Examples of converting Industrial Cluster into art districts include the South of Houston Street (SoHo) in New York, Dashanzi/798 Art District in Beijing, Leipziger Baumwollspinnerei and IBA Emscher Park in Germany.
The fourth type of exhibition spaces were converted from former power plants. Similar to other industrial buildings, many power plants built to supply power to residential and industrial sites shut down due to changes in industrial structure or by being classified as pollution-causing facilities. Many of these power plants have been converted into art spaces since the 1970s. Examples include Tate Modern in United Kingdom, Moderna Museet Malmö in Sweden, CaixaForum Madrid in Spain, and the Power Station of Art in Shanghai.
The fifth type of exhibition spaces were converted from military-industrial facilities. During the World Wars I and II, many military industrial facilities, including munitions factories, bunkers, and military bases, were built in major belligerent countries. When the war ended, many of these military facilities were shut down and left empty. Examples of converting idle military facilities into exhibition spaces include ZKM
Center for Art and Media in Germany, Sammloung Boros, Culture Bunker in Germany, Alvéole 14 in France, and Chinati Foundation in Texas.
It is noteworthy that the exhibition spaces created by converting abandoned industrial buildings are closely linked to urban regeneration and urban refurbishment policies of post-industrial cities. Cities that experienced de-industrialization faced the challenge of reviving the declining economy and rebuilding the ruined urban image. In this situation, converting industrial facilities into cultural spaces could provide opportunities to enhance the city's economic and cultural infrastructure. However, the strategic use of these facilities in national policy may also result in excessive commercialization or function as a means of social control.
This study examined the architectural characteristics of exhibition spaces created by converting abandoned industrial buildings and their relationship with contemporary art works. This study also collected examples of these buildings and provided discussions about their implications and potential future uses. We hope the research will serve as a guide to the emerging cultural space-building projects that focus on deteriorated industrial facilities in South Korea since 2008.
본 논문은 1970년대 이후 유휴 산업시설을 개조해서 만든 전시 공간이 등장하게 된 배경과 사례에 관한 연구이다. 유휴 건축물을 다른 용도로 개조하는 것은 단순히 노후 된 건물을 보수하는 것과 달리, 건물의 기능 자체를 바꾸는 건축 방식이다. 이 건축 방식이 그 가치를 인정받고 하나의 건축 실천으로 주목받기 시작한 것은 1970년대 이후부터지만 그 역사를 거슬러 올라가면 고대 로마제국에서도 사례를 찾을 수 있다.
1세기부터 로마제국 전역에 걸쳐 세워졌던 로마 원형 극장은 거칠고 화려한 각종 고대 스포츠 경기를 치르던 장소로, 이곳에서 치러진 경기는 대중적으로 큰 인기를 끌었다. 하지만 3세기부터 로마제국이 군사적, 정치적, 경제적으로 위기를 맞게 되면서 점차 스포츠 경기를 자주 개최하기 어려워졌고, 스토아학파와 기독교의 지속적인 반대에도 부딪혔다. 결국, 5세기부터 일부 스포츠 경기가 금지되었고, 6세기에는 모든 경기가 완전히 중단되면서 원형극장은 그 기능을 잃게 되었다.
그 후 원형극장은 건축자재를 재활용하기 위해 파괴되거나 다른 용도로 개조되어 사용되었다. 일부 원형극장은 공개처형 장소로 명맥을 유지하거나 교회의 예배지로 바뀌기도 했는데, 대부분의 경우 외부 침략에 대비하기 위해 요새로 개조되었다. 요새화된 원형극장은 출입구가 완전히 봉쇄되고 중앙 경기장인 아레나에 주거용 건물이 세워지는 구조로 개조되었다. 오늘날까지 남아있는 로마 원형극장 일부는 현대적 용도에 맞는 공연장과 체육 경기장으로 다시 사용되고 있다.
과거부터 현재까지 파괴되지 않고 다른 기능으로 개조되고 있는 건축물의 또 다른 예는 기독교 건물이다. 교회 건물은 건축 품질이 우수할 뿐만 아니라 종교적, 문화적 및 예술적인 가치를 인정받았기 때문에 종교적인 기능이 사라져도 쉽게 파괴되거나 해체되지 않고 다른 용도로 재사용되어왔다.
중세 유럽의 교회 건물은 종교개혁을 겪으면서 크게 변화했다. 유럽의 다른 지역과 달리 영국 국교회 종교개혁은 왕실이 주도하는 종교 탄압의 성격을 가진다. 영국 왕실과 교황은 14세기부터 재정 충당과 권력 강화를 목적으로 수도원 건물을 해산시켰고, 가장 많은 수도원이 해산된 16세기 헨리 8세 집권 시기에는 잉글랜드와 웨일즈 일대에서 약 800개의 수도원이 해산되었다. 해산된 수도원은 건축 자재를 재사용하기 위해 파괴되거나 귀족의 별장과 요새 등으로 개조되었다.
1517년에 마틴 루터(Martin Ruther)에 의해 시작된 종교개혁 운동의 영향을 받은 북유럽과 동유럽 국가에서는 새로운 교리에 맞게 교회 건물이 리모델링되었다. 바뀐 교리에 따라 그리스도의 말씀을 전하는 목사의 설교가 중요시되면서 교회 내·외부의 화려한 장식이 사라졌고, 신도석과 설교단이 설치되었다.
20세기 이후에 교회 건물이 다른 용도로 개조되는 이유는 종파가 감소하고 현대인의 종교 생활과 태도가 변했기 때문이다. 작은 규모의 종파가 합쳐지고, 종교 활동에 참여하는 교인의 비율이 줄어들면서 재정적으로 운영이 힘들어진 교회가 건물을 다른 기관에 판매하는 경우가 점차 많아졌다. 지역 인구 구성의 변화도 교회 건물의 존속에 영향을 미쳤다. 인구가 지속해서 감소하는 지방의 작은 교회나 거주 인구가 인근 교외로 옮겨간 도심의 교회는 교인의 수가 감소하면서 건물 유지에 영향을 받았다.
교회 건물을 다른 용도로 개조할 때는 물리적인 측면과 아울러 종교적인맥락을 고려해야하기 때문에 허용 가능한 개조 방법과 용도에 대한 논의가 다양하게 이루어지고 있다. 교회가 지역 사회에서 공공건물로서 기능하기 때문에 교회 건물을 개조할 때는 공적인 목적이나 문화적인 목적으로 사용해야 한다는 주장이 가장 지배적이다. 교회 건물을 문화적인 용도로 개조한 사례는 네덜란드 암스테르담에 위치한 트러스트 극장(Trust Theatre), 노스캐롤라이나 주에 위치한 맥콜 아트센터(McColl Center for Art + Innovation), 프랑스 몽펠리에에 위치한 카흐 성 안느 미술관(Carré Sainte Anne) 등이 있다.
하지만 점차 종파와 상관없이 교회 건물을 사적이고 상업적인 용도로 개조하는 사례가 늘고 있다. 런던에 있는 랜카스터 게이트 교회(Lancaster Gate Christ Church)는 스파이얼 하우스(Spire House)라는 이름의 아파트로 개조되었고, 벨기에 림브르흐주(Limburg)에 있는 교회는 건축사무소로 개조되었으며, 네덜란드 마스트리흐트(Maastricht)에 있는 교회는 호텔로 개조되었다. 하지만 교회 건물을 상업적인 용도로 개조하더라도 주민들의 접근 가능성을 높이고, 도시 이미지를 존중하는 차원에서 이루어지는 것이 중요하다.
유휴 산업시설을 전시 공간으로 개조하는 경향은 1970년대 이후 탈산업화가 진행된 구미 도시에서 처음 등장했다. 1750~60년대에 영국을 시작으로 산업혁명이 일어나면서 유럽과 미국의 주요 도시에는 자원 채취 시설과 운송 시설, 대량생산을 위한 현대식 공장과 발전소 등 많은 산업시설이 건설되었다. 하지만 20세기 초반부터 산업구조의 중심이 제조업에서 서비스업으로 이동하면서 산업화를 겪은 서구 도시들은 큰 변화를 겪었다. 산업의 주원료가 석유와 천연가스로 바뀌면서 많은 탄광 시설들이 운영을 중단했고, 공장, 창고, 발전소 등은 교외 지역으로 밀려나거나 토지 임대료와 인건비가 저렴한 다른 나라로 이전되었다. 또한 산업화 초기에 건설된 철도와 항만 시설이 노후화되면서 유휴 공간이 되기도 했다.
버려지고 방치된 유휴 산업시설을 문화적인 용도로 재사용하게 된 배경에는 사회·문화적 요인, 환경적 요인, 건축사적 요인 및 미술사적 요인이 모두 작용하였다. 첫 번째 배경은 불필요한 것으로 인식되었던 유휴 산업시설에 대한 인식이 1970년대부터 보존해야 할 유산 건축물이라는 인식으로 바뀐 것이다. 1973년 유럽에서 열린 산업유산보전국제회의(The international Conference on the Conservation of the Industrial Heritage, TICCIH)를 통해 산업유산(Industrial Heritage)이라는 용어가 사용되기 시작했고, 산업시설이 건축과 디자인 및 설계 부문에서 중요한 유형적 자산일 뿐만 아니라 산업화 시대에 대한 역사적인 증거 가치를 지닌다는 주장이 제기되었다. 이러한 주장을 바탕으로 유휴 산업시설을 파괴하지 않고 보존하거나 재활용하는 움직임이 생겨났다.
유휴 산업시설을 문화적인 용도로 재사용하게 된 두 번째 배경은 환경과 자원 문제에 대한 인식변화이다. 200년이 넘는 기간 동안 진행된 산업 활동이 자연에 미친 영향과 문제점이 국제적으로 논의되기 시작하면서 신축 건물을 세우는 것은 낭비라는 인식이 생겼고, 이로 인해 기존 건물을 활용하는 방안이 주목받기 시작했다.
세 번째 배경은 1960년대에 등장한 포스트모더니즘 건축 이론의 영향이다. 효율성을 추구하는 모더니즘의 기능주의적 건축 방식과 도시 계획을 비판하면서 등장한 포스트모더니즘 건축 이론은 과거와 전통 및 지역의 역사성을 중요하게 생각하였다. 이러한 태도는 기존의 건축물을 활용하는 용도 변경 건축 방식이 주목받게 되는 또 하나의 배경이 되었다.
네 번째 배경은 미술작품의 형식과 전시 방식의 확장이다. 1960년대와 70년대에는 전통적인 조각과 회화에서 벗어난 새로운 재료와 형식의 미술 작품이 등장하기 시작했다. 이 시기부터 넓은 전시 공간이 필요한 설치 미술이나 인제 비율을 넘어서는 규모의 작품이 만들어지기 시작했고, 모래처럼 흩어지거나 납이나 지방처럼 공간을 더럽힐 수 있는 재료를 사용하는 미술작품이 등장했다. 새로운 형식의 작품들은 작은 방으로 나뉜 희고 깨끗한 전시장보다 규모가 크고 거친 분위기의 공간에서 전시되는 것이 더 어울렸기 때문에 산업 시설물을 개조한 작업실과 전시장이 생겨났다.
이러한 배경 속에서 각 도시에 방치되었던 다양한 유휴 산업시설은 개조를 거쳐 전시 공간으로 재탄생했다. 유휴 산업시설을 개조해서 만든 전시 공간의 첫 번째 유형은 공장과 창고를 개조한 곳이다. 18세기 후반에서 20세기까지 각 나라의 산업도시에는 각종 공장과 이들 공장에서 대량 생산된 상품을 보관하기 위한 창고가 많이 세워졌다. 하지만 탈산업화를 겪으면서 이 건물들은 유휴 공간이 되었고, 남겨진 건물 중 일부는 1970년대 이후 전시 공간으로 개조되었다. 그 사례로는 영국의 발틱 현대 미술관(Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art), 독일의 아헨 루드비히 포럼(Ludwig Forum für Internationale Kunst), 스위스 샤프하우젠의 현대 미술관(Hallen für Neue Kunst), 프랑스의 보르도 현대 미술관(Musée d'Art Contemporain de Bordeaux), 북미지역의 디아(Dia), 매트리스 팩토리(Mattress Factory), 게펜 현대 미술관(The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA), 매사추세츠 현대 미술관(Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art) 등이 있다.
두 번째 유형은 철도역과 항만 시설을 개조해서 만든 전시 공간이다. 철도역과 항만 시설도 산업화가 활발했던 시기에 건설된 주요 산업시설이었다. 원료가 풍부한 지역과 상품을 수출하기 편리한 해안가에는 철도역과 항만 시설이 많이 건설되었다. 하지만 관련 산업의 교역이 줄어들거나 운송 수단이 발전하면서 노후 된 철도역과 항만 시설은 운영을 중단하고 유휴 공간이 되었다. 철도역과 항만 시설을 전시 공간으로 개조한 사례에는 프랑스의 오르세 미술관(Musée d'Orsay), 독일의 함부르크 반호프 미술관(Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart), 호주의 케리지워크(Carriageworks), 영국의 테이트 리버풀(Tete Liverpool) 등이 있다.
세 번째 유형은 산업 집적지가 각종 문화예술 시설이 모인 예술지구로 재탄생한 곳이다. 산업이 발전하면서 주요 도시에는 관련 산업과 기관이 한곳에 모임으로써 발생하는 시너지를 도모하기 위해 산업 집적지가 형성되었다. 하지만 2차 산업이 쇠퇴하면서 산업 집적지는 대규모 유휴 공간이 되었다. 저렴한 작업공간을 찾던 예술가들이 이러한 지역에 자발적으로 모여 예술지구를 형성하거나 광범위한 쇠락 지역을 재생하기 위해 각종 문화시설이 들어서면서 문화지구가 형성되기도 했다. 이에 대한 사례로 미국의 소호(South of Houston Street, SoHo), 중국의 따산즈(大山子) 798, 독일의 라이프치히 복합예술문화공간(Leipziger Baumwollspinnerei), IBA 엠셔 파크(Internationale Bauausstellung Emscher Park) 등이 있다.
네 번째 유형은 발전소를 개조해서 만든 전시 공간이다. 거주지와 산업지에 전력을 공급하기 위해 세워진 발전소는 산업 구조의 변화로 유휴시설이 되거나, 공해 발생 시설로 분류되면서 도심 내에서 운영을 멈추게 되었다. 다른 산업 시설물과 마찬가지로 남겨진 많은 발전소들이 1970년대부터 전시 공간으로 개조되고 있다. 이에 대한 사례로는 영국의 테이트 모던(Tate Modern), 스웨덴의 말뫼 현대 미술관(Moderna Museet Malmö), 스페인의 카익사포럼(CaixaForum Madrid), 중국의 상하이 당대예술관(上海当代艺术馆, Power Station of Art) 등이 있다.
다섯 번째 유형은 군수 산업시설을 개조해서 만든 전시 공간이다. 양차 세계대전을 겪으면서 주요 교전국에는 군수품 공장과 벙커 등 많은 군수 산업시설이 세워졌다. 하지만 전쟁이 종료되면서 상당수의 군수 시설들이 운영을 멈추고 빈 곳으로 남겨졌다. 유휴 군수 시설을 전시 공간으로 개조한 사례로는 독일의 ZKM 아트 앤 미디어 센터(ZKM
Center for Art and Media), 보로스 미술관(Sammloung Boros), 문화 벙커(Kultur Bunker), 프랑스의 알베올 14(Alvéole 14), 텍사스의 차이나티 파운데이션(Chinati Foundation) 등이 있다.
유휴 산업시설을 개조해서 만든 전시 공간은 후기 산업도시의 도시 부흥이나 도시 재생 정책과도 밀접한 연관을 가진다. 탈산업화를 겪은 도시들은 쇠락하는 경제를 회복하고 황폐해진 도시 이미지를 재건해야 하는 과제에 직면했고, 이러한 상황에서 유휴 산업시설을 문화시설로 개조하는 것은 도시의 경제력과 문화적 기반을 높일 수 있는 기회를 제공할 수 있다. 하지만 이 시설들이 국가 정책에 전략적으로 이용됨으로써 사회 통제의 수단으로 기능하거나 지나치게 자본 중심으로 운영됨으로써 과도하게 상업화되는 결과를 낳을 수도 있다.
본 연구는 유휴 산업시설을 개조해서 만든 전시 공간의 사례를 수집하면서 유휴 산업시설의 건축적 특징과 미술작품과의 관계를 알아보고, 개조 과정에서 발생한 논의와 이후의 활용에 대해서도 함께 고찰하였다. 이 연구가 2008년 이후 우리나라에서 진행되고 있는 낙후된 산업시설의 문화 공간 조성 사업에서 앞으로의 발전 방향을 논의할 때 참고가 될 수 있기를 기대한다.
Language
kor
URI
https://hdl.handle.net/10371/151050
Files in This Item:
Appears in Collections:
College of Fine Arts (미술대학)Program in Arts Management (협동과정-미술경영전공)Theses (Master's Degree_협동과정-미술경영전공)
  • mendeley

Items in S-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Browse