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How heuristic behaviour can affect SHM-based decision problems?

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Issue Date
2019-05-26
Citation
13th International Conference on Applications of Statistics and Probability in Civil Engineering(ICASP13), Seoul, South Korea, May 26-30, 2019
Abstract
psychologists call these differences cognitive biases. Many heuristic behaviors have been studied and demonstrated, with applications in various fields such as psychology, cognitive science, economics and finance, but not yet to SHM-based decision problems. SHM-based decision making is particularly susceptible to the representativeness heuristic, where simplified rules for updating probabilities can distort the decision makers perception of risk. In this work, we examine how this heuristic affects the interpretation of data, providing a deeper understanding of the differences between a heuristic method affected by cognitive biases and the classical approach. Our study is conducted both theoretically through comparison with formal Bayesian methods as well as empirically through the application to a real-life case study in the field of civil engineering. With this application we demonstrate the heuristic framework and we show how this cognitive bias affects decision-making by distorting the representation of information provided by SHM.
The main purpose of structural health monitoring (SHM) is to provide accurate and real-time information about the state of a structure, which can be used as objective inputs for decision-making regarding its management. However, SHM and decision-making occur at various stages. SHM assesses the state of a structure based on the acquisition and interpretation of data, which is usually provided by sensors. Conversely, decision-making helps us to identify the optimal management action to undertake. Generally, the research community recognizes people tend to use irrational methods for their interpretation of monitoring data, instead of rational algorithms such as Bayesian inference. People use heuristics as efficient rules to simplify complex problems and overcome the limits in rationality and computation of the human brain. Even though the results are typically satisfactory, they can differ from results derived from a rational process
Language
English
URI
https://hdl.handle.net/10371/153492
DOI
https://doi.org/10.22725/ICASP13.365
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College of Engineering/Engineering Practice School (공과대학/대학원)Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering (건설환경공학부)ICASP13
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