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A single gene of a commensal microbe affects host susceptibility to enteric infection

Cited 15 time in Web of Science Cited 15 time in Scopus
Authors
Yoon, Mi Young; Min, Kyung Bae; Lee, Kang-Mu; Yoon, Yujin; Kim, Yaeseul; Oh, Young Taek; Lee, Keehoon; Chun, Jongsik; Kim, Byung-Yong; Yoon, Seok-Hwan; Lee, Insuk; Kim, Chan Yeong; Yoon, Sang Sun
Issue Date
2016-05
Citation
Nature Communications, Vol.7, p. 11606
Abstract
Indigenous microbes inside the host intestine maintain a complex self-regulating community. The mechanisms by which gut microbes interact with intestinal pathogens remain largely unknown. Here we identify a commensal Escherichia coli strain whose expansion predisposes mice to infection by Vibrio cholerae, a human pathogen. We refer to this strain as 'atypical' E. coli (atEc) because of its inability to ferment lactose. The atEc strain is resistant to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and proliferates extensively in antibiotic-treated adult mice. V. cholerae infection is more severe in neonatal mice transplanted with atEc compared with those transplanted with a typical E. coli strain. Intestinal ROS levels are decreased in atEc-transplanted mice, favouring proliferation of ROS-sensitive V. cholerae. An atEc mutant defective in ROS degradation fails to facilitate V. cholerae infection when transplanted, suggesting that host infection susceptibility can be regulated by a single gene product of one particular commensal species.
ISSN
2041-1723
URI
https://hdl.handle.net/10371/165744
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms11606
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College of Natural Sciences (자연과학대학)Dept. of Biological Sciences (생명과학부)Journal Papers (저널논문_생명과학부)
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