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Environmental adaptation of the heterotrophic-to-autotrophic transition: the developmental plasticity of seedling establishment

Cited 3 time in Web of Science Cited 2 time in Scopus
Authors
Ha, Jun-Ho; Han, Shin-Hee; Lee, Hyo-Jun; Park, Chung-Mo
Issue Date
2017-03
Citation
Critical Reviews in Plant Sciences, Vol.36 No.2, pp.128-137
Keywords
autotrophic transitionchlorophyll biosynthesislight signalingPOR enzymesstress responsethermal adaptation
Abstract
As self-nourishing autotrophs, plants can produce complex organic compounds from carbon dioxide and inorganic materials using light energy and thus are termed photoautotrophs. Developing seedlings achieve autotrophic growth as they acquire photosynthetic competence during seedling establishment. Various developmental programs tightly regulate the heterotrophic-to-autotrophic transition, which is also influenced by environmental conditions through complicated, interacting signaling pathways. Light provides the primary environmental cue that triggers the autotrophic transition, and the underlying molecular and physiological mechanisms are well understood. Other internal and external factors, such as nutrient and water availability, and temperature, contribute to fine-tuning the light-mediated induction of autotrophic transition, showing the plasticity of this process, which allows developing seedlings to adapt to varying environmental conditions. In this review, we summarize recent studies on the molecular events that occur during the autotrophic transition and its adaptation to environmental constraints. We also discuss future prospects and directions in the field.
ISSN
0735-2689
URI
https://hdl.handle.net/10371/171982
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1080/07352689.2017.1355661
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College of Natural Sciences (자연과학대학)Dept. of Chemistry (화학부)Journal Papers (저널논문_화학부)
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