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Prospective Evaluation of the Clinical Implications of the Tumor Metabolism and Chemotherapy-Related Changes in Advanced Biliary Tract Cancer

Cited 3 time in Web of Science Cited 3 time in Scopus
Authors
Jo, Jaemin; Kwon, Hyun Woo; Park, Seongyeol; Oh, Do-Youn; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Bang, Yung-Jue
Issue Date
2017-08
Citation
Journal of Nuclear Medicine, Vol.58 No.8, pp.1255-1261
Keywords
biliary tract neoplasmcarcinomapositron-emission tomographymetabolismprognosis
Abstract
Tumor metabolism measured by F-18-FDG PET has a diagnostic and prognostic role in several cancers. The clinical implication of tumor metabolism in biliary tract cancer (BTC) has not been studied well. Therefore, we evaluated the prognostic value of tumor metabolism and chemotherapy-related changes in advanced BTC patients. Methods: We prospectively enrolled advanced BTC patients before the initiation of palliative chemotherapy. Using F-18-FDG PET, we assessed the baseline SUVmax and monitored the changes in SUVmax during chemotherapy. We analyzed the associations between SUVmax, and clinicopathologic factors and clinical outcomes. Results: Seventy-five patients were enrolled. All patients received gemcitabine/ cisplatin as first-line chemotherapy. Primary tumor site, histologic differentiation, molecular characteristics, laboratory findings, and disease extent were associated with the metabolic characteristics. The high-metabolism group showed worse survival outcome (hazard ratio [HR] = 4.09, P = 0.001 for progression-free survival; HR = 2.61, P = 0.019 for overall survival [OS]) than the low-metabolism group. The lesser reduction of SUVmax was also associated with worse outcome (HR = 3.35, P = 0.002 for progression-free survival; HR = 1.96, P = 0.082 for OS). When both baseline tumor metabolism and its chemotherapy-related changes were considered, patients with a low metabolism and more reduction in metabolism obtained the best OS (20.7 vs. 6.2 mo, P = 0.013). Conclusion: Tumor metabolic activity and the chemotherapy-related changes in the metabolism are associated with prognosis in advanced BTC patients.
ISSN
0161-5505
URI
https://hdl.handle.net/10371/173165
DOI
https://doi.org/10.2967/jnumed.116.186239
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College of Medicine/School of Medicine (의과대학/대학원)Internal Medicine (내과학전공)Journal Papers (저널논문_내과학전공)
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