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Consequences of Submissive Loyalty Corporations: An Empirical Analysis of Korean Female Employees Perception

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Authors
Kim, Hwayeon; Nam, Taewoo
Issue Date
2019-08
Publisher
Graduate School of Public Administration, Seoul National University
Citation
Korean Journal of Policy Studies, Vol.34 No.2, pp. 51-74
Keywords
submissive loyaltywork-life balancejob satisfactionlife satisfactionConfucianism
Abstract
The number of female employees in the Korean workforce has risen. However, the Korean corporate climate, characterized by collectivism, hierarchism, and senior and masculine privilege, leads them to experience worklife conflict and even halt their careers. This climate stems from a social and organizational culture deeply rooted in traditional Confucianism. In Korea, where housework and childcare have long been considered the province of women, female employees find it more difficult to balance office work and family life. The Korean corporate climate welcomes overtime work, and women who work outside the home must juggle this and family responsibilities. We conceptualize behavior such as acquiescing to overtime work as submissive loyalty and elucidate work-family conflict and decreasing job and life satisfaction as consequences thereof. The analysis, based on a structural equation model, revealed that submissive loyalty increases work-family conflict, which decreases job and life satisfaction.
ISSN
1225-5017
Language
English
URI
https://hdl.handle.net/10371/174254
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Graduate School of Public Administration (행정대학원)Dept. of Public Administration (행정학과)Korean Journal of Policy Studies (정책논총)Korean Journal of Policy Studies (정책논총) vol.34 no.1-3 (2019)
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