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Spatiotemporal variations in urban CO2 flux with land-use types in Seoul

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Issue Date
2022-05
Publisher
BioMed Central
Citation
Carbon Balance and Management, Vol.17 No.1, p. 3
Abstract
Background Cities are a major source of atmospheric CO2; however, understanding the surface CO2 exchange processes that determine the net CO2 flux emitted from each city is challenging owing to the high heterogeneity of urban land use. Therefore, this study investigates the spatiotemporal variations of urban CO2 flux over the Seoul Capital Area, South Korea from 2017 to 2018, using CO2 flux measurements at nine sites with different urban land-use types (baseline, residential, old town residential, commercial, and vegetation areas). Results Annual CO2 flux significantly varied from 1.09 kg C m(- 2) year(- 1) at the baseline site to 16.28 kg C m(- 2) year(- 1) at the old town residential site in the Seoul Capital Area. Monthly CO2 flux variations were closely correlated with the vegetation activity (r = - 0.61) at all sites; however, its correlation with building energy usage differed for each land-use type (r = 0.72 at residential sites and r = 0.34 at commercial sites). Diurnal CO2 flux variations were mostly correlated with traffic volume at all sites (r = 0.8); however, its correlation with the floating population was the opposite at residential (r = - 0.44) and commercial (r = 0.80) sites. Additionally, the hourly CO2 flux was highly related to temperature. At the vegetation site, as the temperature exceeded 24 celcius, the sensitivity of CO2 absorption to temperature increased 7.44-fold than that at the previous temperature. Conversely, the CO2 flux of non-vegetation sites increased when the temperature was less than or exceeded the 18 celcius baseline, being three-times more sensitive to cold temperatures than hot ones. On average, non-vegetation urban sites emitted 0.45 g C m(- 2) h(- 1) of CO2 throughout the year, regardless of the temperature. Conclusions Our results demonstrated that most urban areas acted as CO2 emission sources in all time zones; however, the CO2 flux characteristics varied extensively based on urban land-use types, even within cities. Therefore, multiple observations from various land-use types are essential for identifying the comprehensive CO2 cycle of each city to develop effective urban CO2 reduction policies.
ISSN
1750-0680
URI
https://hdl.handle.net/10371/182737
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Graduate School of Environmental Studies (환경대학원)Dept. of Environmental Planning (환경계획학과)Journal Papers (저널논문_환경계획학과)
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