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Air Trapping and the Risk of COPD Exacerbation: Analysis From Prospective KOCOSS Cohort

Cited 6 time in Web of Science Cited 9 time in Scopus
Authors

Kim, Youlim; Kim, Sang Hyuk; Rhee, Chin Kook; Lee, Jae Seung; Lee, Chang Youl; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Shin, Kyeong-Cheol; Jung, Ki Suck; Yoo, Kwang Ha; Park, Yong Bum

Issue Date
2022-03
Publisher
Frontiers Media S.A.
Citation
Frontiers in Medicine, Vol.9, p. 835069
Abstract
Background and AimsAir trapping is a predictive index for a decline in lung function and mortality in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the role of air trapping in COPD exacerbation has rarely been studied. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the impact of air trapping as a continuous parameter on COPD exacerbation. Materials and MethodsTo evaluate air trapping, we identified the ratio of residual volume (RV) to total lung capacity (TLC) of patients with COPD from the Korean COPD Subgroup Study (KOCOSS) cohort, which is a multicenter-based, prospective, consecutive cohort in Korea. The primary outcome was a development of COPD exacerbation during 3 years of follow-up. ResultsOf 2,181 participants, 902 patients measured the RV/TLC ratio in the baseline enrollment, and 410 were evaluated for assessing the development of COPD exacerbation. Of 410 patients, the rate of moderate to severe exacerbation and severe exacerbation was 70.7% and 25.9%. A 10% increase of RV/TLC ratio increased the risk of the moderate to severe exacerbation by 35% and severe exacerbation by 36%. In subgroup analysis, an interaction effect between triple inhaled therapy and the RV/TLC ratio for severe exacerbation nullified the association between the RV/TLC ratio and severe exacerbation (p for interaction = 0.002). ConclusionsIn this prospective cohort study, we found that air trapping (representing RV/TLC ratio as a continuous parameter) showed an association with an increased risk of COPD exacerbation, particularly in patients who have not undergone triple inhaler therapy.
ISSN
2296-858X
URI
https://hdl.handle.net/10371/183819
DOI
https://doi.org/10.3389/fmed.2022.835069
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