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Among the Media Journalism Education in a Commercial Culture

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Authors
Hardt, Hanno
Issue Date
2001
Publisher
Institute of Communication Research, Seoul National University
Citation
Journal of Communication Research, Vol.38, pp. 207-225
Keywords
major changesmedia circuscorporate concentration
Abstract
Journalism education as an academic pursuit has run its course during this century: from representing the interests of newspaper proprietors through a period of increasing academic standards and a new intellectual respectability to current alliances between media interests and educational endeavors. During this time journalism education has remained committed to meeting organizational demands without much consideration of the concrete historical conditions of working journalists.
By focusing on the predicament of contemporary newswork I intend to place journalism education at the service of journalists and the struggle of intellectual labor-and against the commercialization of journalism in the United States. The larger context for this approach--of course--is the relationship between journalism and power. By identifying with various economic and political interests, American journalism has effectively abandoned its self-proclaimed cause of serving the people to
accommodate its own fascination with social and political power. The resulting consequences for notions of news, democracy, and citizenship are considerable and must be of major interest to media studies and journalism education.
ISSN
1738-6195
Language
English
URI
https://hdl.handle.net/10371/1965
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College of Social Sciences (사회과학대학)Institute of Communication Research (언론정보연구소)Journal of Communication Research (언론정보연구)Journal of Communication Research (언론정보연구) vol.38 (2001)
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