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In-Source Fragmentation and the Sources of Partially Tryptic Peptides in Shotgun Proteomics

Cited 43 time in Web of Science Cited 46 time in Scopus
Authors

Kim, Jong-Seo; Monroe, Matthew E.; Camp, David G., II; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Wei-Jun

Issue Date
2013-02
Publisher
American Chemical Society
Citation
Journal of Proteome Research, Vol.12 No.2, pp.910-916
Abstract
Partially tryptic peptides are often identified in shotgun proteomics using trypsin as the proteolytic enzyme; however, their sources have been controversial. Herein, we investigate the impact of in-source fragmentation on shotgun proteomics profiling of three biological samples: a standard protein mixture, a mouse brain tissue homogenate, and mouse plasma. Because the in-source fragments of peptide ions have the same LC elution time as their parental peptides, partially tryptic peptide ions from in-source fragmentation can be distinguished from other partially tryptic peptides based on their elution time differences from those computationally predicted data. The percentage of partially tryptic peptide identifications resulting from in-source fragmentation in a standard protein digest was observed to be similar to 60%. In more complex mouse brain or plasma samples, in-source fragmentation contributed to a lesser degree of 1-3% of all identified peptides due to the limited dynamic range of LC-MS/MS measurements. The other major source of partially tryptic peptides in complex biological samples is presumably proteolytic cleavage by endogenous proteases in the samples. Our work also provides a method to identify such proteolytic-derived partially tryptic peptides due to endogenous proteases in the samples by removing in-source fragmentation artifacts from the identified peptides.
ISSN
1535-3893
URI
https://hdl.handle.net/10371/201897
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1021/pr300955f
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  • College of Natural Sciences
  • School of Biological Sciences
Research Area Molecular Interactomics, Proteomics, Systems Biology, 단백체학, 분자상호작용체학, 시스템생물학

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