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Spatial accuracy of fMRI activation influenced by volume- and surface-based spatial smoothing techniques

Cited 61 time in Web of Science Cited 60 time in Scopus
Authors
Jo, Hang Joon; Lee, Jong-Min; Kim, Jae-Hun; Shin, Yong-Wook; Kim, In-Young; Kwon, Jun Soo; Kim, Sun I
Issue Date
2007
Publisher
Elsevier
Citation
Neuroimage 34 (2), 550-564
Keywords
Brain/*radionuclide imagingBrain Mapping/instrumentation/*methodsHumansImage Processing, Computer-Assisted/instrumentation/*methodsImaging, Three-Dimensional/instrumentation/*methodsMagnetic Resonance Imaging/instrumentation/*methodsPhantoms, ImagingSensitivity and Specificity
Abstract
As improvements in cortical surface modeling allowed accurate cortical topology in brain imaging studies, surface-based methods for the analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) were introduced to overcome the topological deficiency of commonly used volume-based methods. The difference between the two methods is mainly due to the smoothing techniques applied. For practical applications, the surface-based methods need to quantitatively validate the accuracy of localizing activation. In this study, we evaluated the spatial accuracy of activation detected by the volume- and surface-based methods using simulated blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals and MRI phantoms focusing on the influence of their smoothing techniques. T1- and T2-weighted phantoms were acquired from BrainWeb () and used to extract cortical surfaces and to generate echo planar imaging (EPI) data. Simulated BOLD signals as the gold standard of activation in our experiment were applied to the surfaces and projected to the volume space with random noise. Three-dimensional isotropic Gaussian kernel smoothing and two-dimensional heat kernel smoothing were applied to the volume- and surface-based methods. Sensitivity and 1-specificity, which are truly and falsely detected activations, and similarity measures, which are spatially and statistically similar for the gold standard and detected activations, were calculated. In the results, the surface-based method showed the sensitivity and similarity scores of about 12% higher than the volume-based method. In conclusion, the surface-based method guarantees better spatial accuracy for the localization of BOLD signal sources within the cortex than the volume-based method.
ISSN
1053-8119 (Print)
Language
English
URI
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6WNP-4MBT224-5&_user=10&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=b1374de1f984c782d312a021934475e0

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=17110131

https://hdl.handle.net/10371/23433
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2006.09.047
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College of Medicine/School of Medicine (의과대학/대학원)Psychiatry (정신과학전공)Journal Papers (저널논문_정신과학전공)
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