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『나사의 조임』과 읽기 전략
A Strategy for Reading The Turn of the Screw

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Authors
이정호
Issue Date
2008
Publisher
서울대학교 인문대학 영어영문학과
Citation
영학논집, Vol.28, pp. 1-21
Keywords
ISAsinterpellationgovernesshomosexualitypedophiliaindividuation
Abstract
Henry James was a prolific writer of many full-length novels. It is, however, an interesting phenomenon that his novella, The Turn of the Screw, outshines almost all his novels, attracting many readers and inviting diverse kinds of interpretations. One of the reasons why this novella has been so popular with readers is that it has remained "a chameleon text," and "indeed, The Turn of the Screw has probably been discussed more than any other modern story," as Booth pointed out.
When it was fist published in 1898, it was generally interpreted as a gothic story of ghosts. In those days the existence of ghosts was believed by the general populace. As time went by, and the general public no longer believed the existence of supernatural beings, different kinds of approaches have been applied in reading this story.
One of the main currents of interpretation of this story would be that of Jungian reading. According to Jung, a fully matured individual would have achieved individuation by transcending the binary opposition of good and evil. The governess of this story has yet to achieve individuation, as a product of strict Vidorian patriarchal family education. The ghosts of Peter Quint and Miss Jessel, therefore, could be the projections of her own shadows. We may also conjecture that James would have a homosexual orientation, and that his sexual orientation may have been a factor in making the descriptions in the story so ambiguous.
Language
Korean
URI
https://hdl.handle.net/10371/2395
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College of Humanities (인문대학)English Language and Literature (영어영문학과)영학논집(English Studies)영학논집(English Studies) No.28 (2008)
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