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Benign prostatic hyperplasia and subsequent risk of bladder cancer

Cited 16 time in Web of Science Cited 17 time in Scopus
Authors
Kang, D.; Chokkalingam, A. P.; Gridley, G.; Nyren, O.; Johansson, J. E.; Adami, H. O.; Silverman, D.; Hsing, A. W.
Issue Date
2007
Publisher
Nature Publishing Group
Citation
Br J Cancer 96: 1475-1479
Keywords
Cohort StudiesFollow-Up StudiesHumansIncidenceMaleProstatic Hyperplasia/complications/*epidemiology/surgeryRegistriesRisk FactorsSweden/epidemiologyTime FactorsUrinary Bladder Neoplasms/*epidemiology
Abstract
We evaluated the risk of bladder cancer in a cohort of 79,280 Swedish men hospitalised for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), identified in the Swedish Inpatient Register between 1964 and 1983 and followed until 1989 via multiple record linkages with nationwide data on cancer registry, death and emigration. Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs), the ratios of the observed to the expected numbers of incident bladder cancers, were used to calculate the risk associated with BPH. The expected number was calculated by multiplying the number of person-years by the age-specific cancer incidence rates in Sweden for each 5-year age group and calendar year of observation. Analyses were stratified by BPH treatment, latency, calendar year and presence of genitourinary (GU) comorbid conditions. After excluding the first 3 years of follow-up after the index hospitalisation, we observed 506 incident bladder cancer cases during follow-up in the cohort. No overall increased risk of bladder cancer was apparent in our main analysis involving the entire BPH cohort. However, among BPH patients with transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), there was an increased risk in all follow-up periods; SIRs of bladder cancer during years 4-6 of follow-up was 1.22 (95% confidence interval=1.02-1.46), 1.32 for 7-9 years of follow-up, and 1.47 for 10-26 years of follow-up. SIRs of bladder cancer among TURP-treated BPH patients were particularly elevated among those with comorbid conditions of the GU tract (e.g., stone, infection, etc.); 1.72, 1.74 and 2.01 for 4-6, 7-9, 10-26 years of follow-up, respectively, and also for those whose diagnoses occurred before 1975, when TURP was more likely to be performed by a urologist than a general practitioner: 1.87, 1.90 and 1.74, respectively. These findings suggest that BPH overall is not associated with bladder cancer risk. However, among men treated with TURP, particularly those with other comorbid GU tract conditions, risk of bladder cancer was elevated.
ISSN
0007-0920 (Print)
Language
English
URI
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=17473820

http://hdl.handle.net/10371/24798
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.bjc.6603730
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College of Medicine/School of Medicine (의과대학/대학원)Preventive Medicine (예방의학전공)Journal Papers (저널논문_예방의학전공)
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