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D. H. lawrence의 Woman in Love 연구
A Study of D. H. Lawrence's Women in Love

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Authors
백낙청
Issue Date
1980
Publisher
서울대학교 인문대학
Citation
인문논총, Vol.5, pp. 133-163
Abstract
This paper proposes to study Women in Love as a novel that questions the meaning of
the age of technology. At the same time, it attempts to explore a "Third World" perspective
in our reading of European literature. Such a perspective would naturally have to
be more than a defense mechanism on the part of Third World readers, and contribute
to a truer understanding of the work in question.
TWO assumptions underlie our reading of Women in Love. First, a work which obviously
falls short of any comprehensive treatment of the industrial-technological civilization may
nevertheless question its meaning in an essential manner, because "the essence of technology"
(in Heidegger's words) "is not anything technological." Secondly, it is a work that
addresses itself to the real questions of the real world in a "realistic" way-only exploring
a dimension of reality neglected by even the greatest novelists of the previous century.
The essential meaning of technology is questioned most explicitly through the figure of
Gerald, the "industrial magnate", especially in Ch. 17. His death brings to light the danger
for man in the technological age. But the story of the more successful pair, Birkin
and Ursula, cannot be fully appreciated, either, unless seen against the background of the
world-historial destiny that Gerald represents. Much critical incomprehension as to the
artistic rightness of particular passages or episodes may be traced to this failure.
To many Western readers, especially those who are termed "progressive" within the
limits of the Western world, suggestions of a racial destiny in Gerald present an added
difficulty. From the vantage point of the Third World, however, these rnerely reflect the
actual conflation of the destinies of European races with a particular (the earlier) phase
of global rule of technology. Gerald's failure does imply adverse judgment of the Western
man in that phase but no blanket condemnation, for it presents not an allegory of fatality
but a realistic character alongside others of the same race pointing to a different course.
Birkin's search for "another kind of love" also takes on a fuller meaning in the Third
World context, not because the more "backward" nations remain (as yet) closer to thedays of Blutbriiderschaft but because in their encounter with technology as a global destiny
the achievement of some such comradely love on a massive scale becomes as much a
key to survival and freedom as any technical ability to duplicate Gerald's industrial accomplishment.
ISSN
1598-3021
Language
Korean
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10371/26082
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College of Humanities (인문대학)Institute of Humanities (인문학연구원)Journal of humanities (인문논총)Journal of Humanities vol.05 (1980) (인문논총)
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