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Partial evidence of an association between epidermal growth factor A61G polymorphism and age at onset in male schizophrenia

Cited 13 time in Web of Science Cited 12 time in Scopus
Authors
Lee, Kyu Young; Ahn, Yong Min; Joo, Eun-Jeong; Joo, Yeon Ho; Chang, Jae Seung; Yoo, Han Young; Kim, Yong Sik
Issue Date
2006-09-19
Publisher
Elsevier
Citation
Neurosci Res. 2006 Dec;56(4):356-62. Epub 2006 Sep 18.
Keywords
AdolescentAdultAge of OnsetAllelesEpidermal Growth Factor/*geneticsFemaleHumansMalePolymorphism, Genetic/geneticsPsychiatric Status Rating ScalesSchizophrenia/*geneticsSchizophrenic PsychologySex Characteristics
Abstract
Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a well-known neurotrophic factor regulating the development of various neuronal cells, including dopaminergic neurons, and dysfunction of EGF signals has been demonstrated as a risk factor for schizophrenia. Recently, several researchers have investigated associations including age at onset (AAO) with EGF A61G functional polymorphism, but the results of these studies have been controversial. Thus, we investigated whether A61G plays a role in predisposition to schizophrenia and its effects on AAO. Our subjects included 190 patients with schizophrenia and 347 controls. We assessed three different points of AAO: age at first occurrence of positive psychotic symptoms, medication, and hospitalization as a patient with schizophrenia. We found no differences in allele and genotype frequencies between patients and controls or associations between A61G and AAOs across stratified points in the entire sample and in each gender. However, we found significant gender differences in patients with the AA genotype in all stratified points of AAOs. Subset analyses of G allele distribution between clinical subsets with an AAO cutoff of 20 years revealed that male patients with early onset schizophrenia were more likely to exhibit the common AA homozygote than male patients with adulthood onset schizophrenia. In conclusion, although we were unable to support an association between EGF A61G and schizophrenia, the AA genotype might play a disease-modifying role differentially according to gender.
ISSN
0168-0102 (Print)
Language
English
URI
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6T0H-4KXDR0N-1&_user=10&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=2d4c464de60b1770d7f7ac59368ba803

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=16979250

https://hdl.handle.net/10371/28363
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neures.2006.08.004
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College of Medicine/School of Medicine (의과대학/대학원)Psychiatry (정신과학전공)Journal Papers (저널논문_정신과학전공)
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