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Metals in particulate pollutants affect peak expiratory flow of schoolchildren

Cited 44 time in Web of Science Cited 49 time in Scopus
Authors
Hong, Yun-Chul; Hwang, Seung-Sik; Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Kyoung-Ho; Lee, Hyun-Jung; Lee, Kwan-Hee; Yu, Seung-Do; Kim, Dae-Seon
Issue Date
2007-04-14
Publisher
Nat Inst of Environ Health Sciences / The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
Citation
Environ Health Perspect 115:430-434
Keywords
Air Pollutants/analysis/*toxicityChildFemaleGenotypeGlutathione Transferase/geneticsHumansKoreaMaleMetals/analysis/*toxicityParticle SizeParticulate Matter/analysis/*toxicityPeak Expiratory Flow Rate/*drug effectsPolymorphism, Genetic
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The contribution of the metal components of particulate pollutants to acute respiratory effects has not been adequately evaluated. Moreover, little is known about the effects of genetic polymorphisms of xenobiotic metabolism on pulmonary function. OBJECTIVES: This study was conducted to assess lung function decrement associated with metal components in particulate pollutants and genetic polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferase M1 and T1. METHODS: We studied 43 schoolchildren who were in the 3rd to 6th grades. Each student measured peak expiratory flow rate three times a day for 42 days. Particulate air concentrations were monitored every day, and the concentrations of iron, manganese, lead, zinc, and aluminum in the particles were measured. Glutathione S-transferase M1 and T1 genetic polymorphisms were determined using DNA extracted from participant buccal washings. We used a mixed linear regression model to estimate the association between peak expiratory flow rate and particulate air pollutants. RESULTS: We found significant reduction in the peak expiratory flow rate after the children's exposure to particulate pollutants. The effect was shown most significantly 1 day after exposure to the ambient particles. Manganese and lead in the particles also reduced the peak expiratory flow rate. Genetic polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferase M1 and T1 did not significantly affect peak expiratory flow rate. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that particulate pollutants and metals such as manganese and lead in the particles are associated with a decrement of peak expiratory flow rate. These effects were robust even with consideration of genetic polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferase.
ISSN
0091-6765 (Print)
Language
English
URI
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=17431494

https://hdl.handle.net/10371/28566
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1289/ehp.9531
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College of Medicine/School of Medicine (의과대학/대학원)Preventive Medicine (예방의학전공)Journal Papers (저널논문_예방의학전공)
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