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동적이미지 분석을 이용한 셰익스피어 극 읽기
Appreciating Shakespeare Through Dramatic Imagery

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Authors
이노경
Issue Date
2005
Publisher
서울대학교 인문대학 인문학연구원
Citation
인문논총, Vol.54, pp. 225-244
Keywords
무대독자극적 이미지동적 이미지
Abstract
The importance of a stage in plays cannot be ignored. Excessive attention to
the stage, however, has become an obstacle to an approach to plays as
literature. The appreciation of plays on the stage by an audience is a very
different experience from that of a reader of the plays. The former is special and
attractive, but passive and limited, whereas the latter asks active, aggressive, and
creative intervention as a reader. The reader who is willing to directly
communicate with the plays, giving special meanings and new interpretation to
every word and line, not only reads the plays, but looks into the imaginary stage
of the mind.
Plays can be appreciated through pages like other literary genres, but the
readers must consider the stage as a center of reading process. Most playwrights
deliberately create their works under the premise of performance on the stage,
so readers must pay appropriate attention to stage effect. Although the
unbalanced emphasis on the stage makes the reading experience seem a
worthless substitute for the stage, the existence of the stage can be a
discriminating means of a literary approach to the plays.
Under such proposition, this article suggests dramatic imagery can be one of
the best appreciating methods when plays are read. Dramatic imagery is created
by repeated motions, verbs. It gives a very dynamic pattern to the plays and
connects most naturally with stage movements and themes. To explore the
effects of this imagery, this article also says that Shakespeares plays can be a
good guide to appreciating the plays through pages, giving a chance to improve
literary ability, to catch up dramatic imagery, and to analyse and understand
main themes, structure and styles on the basis of this imagery. Through the
recognition of such dynamic patterns of movement as up and down in Richard
II, stopping and leaping in Macbeth, and fixity and flux in Anthony and
Cleopatra, the meaning of the plays can be expected to extend beyond stages
and scripts.
ISSN
1598-3021
Language
Korean
URI
https://hdl.handle.net/10371/29626
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College of Humanities (인문대학)Institute of Humanities (인문학연구원)Journal of humanities (인문논총)Journal of Humanities vol.54 (2005) (인문논총)
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