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Adult sail sign: radiographic and computed tomographic features

Cited 2 time in Web of Science Cited 1 time in Scopus
Authors
Lee, Yu-Jin; Han, Daehee; Koh, Young Hwan; Zo, Joo Hee; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Lee, Jeong Sang; Moon, Hyeon Jong; Kim, Jong Seung; Chun, Eun Ju; Youn, Byung Jae; Lee, Chang Hyun; Kim, Sam Soo
Issue Date
2008-01-23
Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Citation
Acta Radiol. 2008 Feb;49(1):37-40.
Keywords
Adipose Tissue/radiographyAdultAgedAged, 80 and overFemaleHumansIncidenceMaleMediastinal Diseases/epidemiology/*radiographyMediastinum/radiographyMiddle AgedObserver VariationProspective StudiesRadiography, Thoracic/*methodsSensitivity and SpecificityThymus Gland/radiographyTomography, X-Ray Computed/*methods
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The sail sign is a well-known radiographic feature of the pediatric chest. This sign can be observed in an adult population as well, but for a different reason. PURPOSE: To investigate the sail sign appearing in adult chest radiography. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Based on two anecdotal adult cases in which frontal chest radiographs showed the sail sign, we prospectively screened radiographs of 10,238 patients to determine the incidence of the sail sign found in adults in their 40s or older. The cause of the sail sign was assessed using computed tomography (CT). RESULTS: The sail sign was revealed in 10 (seven males, three females; median age 60.6 years) of 10,238 patients. Of these 10 patients with a sail sign on frontal radiographs, eight underwent CT. The frontal radiographs of these 10 patients showed a concave superior margin toward the lung in nine patients, a concave inferior margin in five, and a double-lined inferior margin in three. Lateral radiographs disclosed a focal opacity over the minor fissure in five of six patients, which was either fuzzy (n = 4) or sharp (n = 1) in its upper margin, and was sometimes double lined in the inferior margin (n = 3). CT revealed the anterior mediastinal fat to be the cause of the radiographic sail sign, which stretched laterally from the mediastinum to insinuate into the minor fissure. CONCLUSION: The incidence of sail sign on adult chest radiographs is about 0.1%. The sign is specific enough to eliminate the need for more sophisticated imaging.
ISSN
1600-0455 (Electronic)
Language
English
URI
http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all?content=10.1080/02841850701675677

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=18210313

https://hdl.handle.net/10371/29709
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1080/02841850701675677
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College of Medicine/School of Medicine (의과대학/대학원)Internal Medicine (내과학전공)Journal Papers (저널논문_내과학전공)
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