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Characterization of Chemisorbed Hyaluronic Acid Directly Immobilized on Solid Substrates

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dc.contributor.authorSuh, Kahp Y.-
dc.contributor.authorYang, Jen Min-
dc.contributor.authorKhademhosseini, Ali-
dc.contributor.authorBerry, David-
dc.contributor.authorTran, Thanh-Nga T.-
dc.contributor.authorPark, Hyongshin-
dc.contributor.authorLanger, Robert-
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-07T07:56:58Z-
dc.date.available2009-08-07T07:56:58Z-
dc.date.issued2005-02-15-
dc.identifier.citationJ Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater 2005;72B:292-298en
dc.identifier.issn1552-4973-
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10371/6536-
dc.description.abstractHyaluronic acid (HA) has a number of potential biomedical applications in drug delivery and tissue engineering. For these applications, a prerequisite is to understand the characteristic of HA films directly immobilized to solid substrates. Here, we demonstrate that high molecular weight HA can be directly immobilized onto hydrophilic substrates without any chemical manipulation, allowing for the formation of an ultrathin chemisorbed layer. Hyaluronic acid is stabilized on these surfaces through hydrogen bonding between the hydrophilic moieties in HA [such as carboxylic acid (-COOH) or hydroxyl (-OH) groups] with silanol (-SiOH), carboxylic acid or hydroxyl groups on the hydrophilic substrates. Despite the water solubility, the chemisorbed HA layer remained stable on glass or silicon oxide substrates for at least 7 days in phosphate-buffered saline. Furthermore, HA immobilized on silicon and other dioxide surfaces in much higher quantities than other polysaccharides including dextran sulfate, heparin, heparin sulfate, chondroitin sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and alginic acid. This behavior is related to the molecular entanglement and intrinsic stiffness of HA as a result of strong internal and external hydrogen bonding as well as high molecular weight. These results demonstrate that HA can be used to coat surfaces through direct immobilization.en
dc.description.sponsorshipDr. Suh thanks the support by the Brain Korea 21 Project in 2004 and Dr. Yang thanks the support from the National Science Council
of Republic of China and the partial support from Chang Gung Hospital. D. Berry is supported by a Howard Hughes Medical Institute predoctorial fellowship. This work was supported by the U.S. Army Research Office through the Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies of MIT (grant number: DAAD-19-02-D0002) and the content of the information does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the Government, and no official endorsement should be inferred.
en
dc.language.isoen-
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sonsen
dc.subjecthyaluronic aciden
dc.subjectdirect immobilizationen
dc.subjectcharacterizationen
dc.subjectchemisorptionen
dc.subjectsubstratesen
dc.subjectRAY PHOTOELECTRON-SPECTROSCOPYen
dc.subjectMOLECULAR-BASISen
dc.subjectPOLYSACCHARIDEen
dc.subjectSURFACESen
dc.subjectRECOGNITIONen
dc.subjectPOLYSTYRENEen
dc.subjectDEGRADATIONen
dc.subjectDERIVATIVESen
dc.titleCharacterization of Chemisorbed Hyaluronic Acid Directly Immobilized on Solid Substratesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor서갑양-
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor양제민-
dc.contributor.AlternativeAuthor박형신-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/jbm.b.30152-
Appears in Collections:
College of Engineering/Engineering Practice School (공과대학/대학원)Dept. of Mechanical Aerospace Engineering (기계항공공학부)Journal Papers (저널논문_기계항공공학부)
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