Browse

The Role of Parental Input in the Acquisition of Tense-Aspect Morphology

Cited 0 time in Web of Science Cited 0 time in Scopus
Issue Date
2001
Publisher
Institute for Cognitive Science, Seoul National University
Citation
Journal of cognitive science, Vol.2 No.2, pp. 119-143
Abstract
In 1973, Roger Brown documented two interesting patterns on
young childrens acquisition of English inflectional suffixes. First, the
earliest grammatical marker in childrens speech, the progressive aspect
marker -ing , appears to be used always correctly. In particular, children
never use -ing incorrectly with state verbs; for example, they do not
produce overgeneralizations like knowing or wanting. Second, Englishspeaking
children first use past tense forms with only a small, semantically coherent set of verbs, including dropped, slipped, crashed, and broke, which name events of such brief duration that the event is almost certain
to have ended before one can speak" (Brown, 1973, p.334). Some years
after Brown s findings , Bloom, Lifter, and Hafitz (1980) provided further
evidence that confirms Brown s analyses. They found that the inflections
used by young English-speaking children (between ages of 1;10 and 2;4)
correlated with the semantic types of verbs: -ing occurred almost
exclusively with verbs such as play, ride, and write (durative ,
nonresultative), whereas the past tense forms occurred with verbs such as
find, fall, and break (punctual, resultative). Brown and Bloom et al. s data
suggest a picture of early undergeneralization" in the acquisition of
inflectional morphology: rather than using tense-aspect markers with all
types of verbs, as adults do, children use them more restrictively.
ISSN
1598-2327
Language
English
URI
https://hdl.handle.net/10371/70704
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.
Appears in Collections:
College of Humanities (인문대학)Institute for Cognitive Science (인지과학연구소)Journal of Cognitive Science (인지과학작업)Journal of Cognitive Science (인지과학작업) vol.02 (2001)
  • mendeley

Items in S-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Browse