Browse

The Koreanization of the Australian Sex Industry: A Policy and Legislative Challenge

Cited 0 time in Web of Science Cited 0 time in Scopus
Authors
Norma, Caroline
Issue Date
2011
Publisher
Graduate School of Public Administration, Seoul National University
Citation
Korean Journal of Policy Studies, Vol.26 No.3, pp. 13-36
Keywords
prostitutiontraffickingSouth KoreaAustraliapolicylegislationfeminism
Abstract
South Korea enacted legislation in 2004 that penalizes pimps, traffickers, and sex industry customers while decriminalizing people in prostitution and offering assistance to leave the sex industry. In contrast, Australia legally recognizes most sex industry activities. This article argues that Australias laissezfaire approach to the sex industry hampers South Korean government efforts to prevent the crime of sex trafficking. Since 2004, pimps and traffickers have moved their activities from South Korea to countries like Australia and the US that maintain relatively hospitable operating environments for the sex industry.
The Australian government should reconsider its approach to prostitution on the basis of its diplomatic obligations to countries like South Korea and the need to uphold the human rights of women in Asia who are being trafficked and murdered as a result of sexual demand emanating from Australia. Australia should coordinate its policy on prostitution with South Korea to strengthen the regions transnational anti-trafficking response.
ISSN
1225-5017
Language
English
URI
https://hdl.handle.net/10371/75651
Files in This Item:
Appears in Collections:
Graduate School of Public Administration (행정대학원)Dept. of Public Administration (행정학과)Korean Journal of Policy Studies (정책논총)Korean Journal of Policy Studies (정책논총) vol.26 no.1-3 (2011)
  • mendeley

Items in S-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Browse