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Association between blood lead levels (< 5 mu g/dL) and inattention-hyperactivity and neurocognitive profiles in school-aged Korean children

Cited 31 time in Web of Science Cited 40 time in Scopus
Authors
Kim, Yeni; Cho, Soo-Churl; Kim, Bung-Nyun; Hong, Yun-Chul; Yoo, Hee-Jeong; Bhang, Soo-Young; Kim, Jae-Won; Shin, Min-Sup
Issue Date
2010-11-01
Publisher
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV
Citation
SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT; Vol.408 23; 5737-5743
Keywords
ChildrenInattentionHyperactivityLearningLead
Abstract
Objectives The association between low blood lead levels (<5 mu g/dL) and the inattention-hyperactivity symptoms and neurocognitive profiles of school-aged Korean children was investigated Methods We measured blood lead levels in 256 Korean children aged 8-10 years Teachers completed the Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Rating Scale (T-ARS)-IV to assess inattentive and hyperactive symptoms. Parents completed the Korean version of the Learning Disability Evaluation Scale (K-LDES) Children performed neurocognitive tests [The Continuous Performance Test (CPT) the Children`s Color Trails Test, and the Stroop Color and Word Test (SCWT)] Results. A linear regression analysis indicated that the blood lead concentrations were associated with the inattention scores [B = 48, SE = 1 6.95% confidence interval (Cl): 15-80], the hyperactivity subscores (3.1, 1 4, 0 3-5.9), and the total score (7.9, 29, 2.1-13.6) on the T-ARS, the number of omission errors on the CPT (20 6, 7 1, 6 5-34 6), the listening (-1.4, 07, -2.8 to -0.1), reading (-21, 07, -3.4 to -0.7), writing (-20, 07, -34 to -0.6), spelling (-22, 07, -37 to -07). and calculating (-1 8, 07, -3 1 to -0.4) scores on the K-LDES, and the color-word score on the SCWT (-67, 34, -13.3 to -01) A logistic regression analysis indicated that the probability of inattentive and hyperactive symptoms was increased with higher blood lead levels in boys with an odds ratio of 2 768 [B= 1 018. S E. = 0 487, p = 0 036. 95% CI: 1 066-7.187] Conclusion This study suggests that even low blood lead levels (<51 mu g/dL) are associated with inattentive and hyperactivity symptoms and learning difficulties in school-aged children (C) 2010 Elsevier BV All rights reserved
ISSN
0048-9697
Language
English
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10371/76876
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2010.07.070
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College of Medicine/School of Medicine (의과대학/대학원)Preventive Medicine (예방의학전공)Journal Papers (저널논문_예방의학전공)
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