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Investigation of the relationship between acne and diet in Korean patients

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Authors
Suh, Dae Hun; Jung, Jae Yoon; Yoon, Mi Young; Min, Seong Uk
Issue Date
2010-03
Publisher
MOSBY-ELSEVIER
Citation
JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF DERMATOLOGY; Vol.62 3; AB1-AB1
Abstract
There has been much controversy about the relationship between acne and foods.
Some researchers contended that acne may be provoked or aggravated by some
foods. However, the more general consensus was that acne was not affected by
foods. They said there is no relationship between acne severity and total calorie
intake, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, minerals, and amino acids. Recently, some
researchers awakened our interest by concluding that there is a positive relationship
between acne and foods in their analytic studies. From their epidemiologic data, it
was suggested there is a causative relationship between acne and foods.
A hypothetical mechanism was also suggested. We enrolled 783 patients with
acne and 502 control subjects. For the patients with acne, blood tests for IGF-1,
IGFBP-3, PP2, DHEA-S, and testosterone were performed. The acne patients were
divided into an aggravated by food group (AF) and a not aggravated by food
group (NAF). All participants were asked to fill out a questionnaire.
The frequency of vegetable and fish intake was significantly higher in the control
group than in the acne group. Intake of instant noodles, junk food, carbonated
drinks, snacks, processed cheeses, pork (braised), pork (roasted), chicken (fried),
chicken (stewed), nuts, and seaweed were significantly higher in the acne patients
than in the controls. Intake of roasted pork, fried chicken, and nuts was significantly
higher in the AF group than in the NAF group. In addition, the regularity of intermeal
intervals and breakfast intake were significantly lower in the acne patients.
IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 showed gender difference.
This study showed that a high glycemic load diet, dairy food intake, high fat diet, and
iodine in Korean foods appear to play a role in acne exacerbation. In addition, it is
suggested that irregular dietary patterns may also aggravate acne.
ISSN
0190-9622
Language
English
URI
https://hdl.handle.net/10371/78377
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2009.11.039
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College of Medicine/School of Medicine (의과대학/대학원)Dermatology (피부과학전공)Journal Papers (저널논문_피부과학전공)
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