Browse

Prediagnosis smoking, obesity, insulin resistance, and second primary cancer risk in male cancer survivors: National health insurance corporation study

Cited 58 time in Web of Science Cited 59 time in Scopus
Authors
Park, Sang Min; Lim, Min Kyung; Jung, Kyu Won; Shin, Soon Ae; Yoo, Keun-Young; Yun, Young Ho
Issue Date
2007-10
Publisher
American Society of Clinical Oncology
Citation
JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY Vol.25 No.30, pp. 4835-4843
Keywords
의약학
Abstract
Purpose Smoking, obesity, and insulin resistance are well-known risk factors for cancer, yet few epidemiology studies evaluate their role as risk factors for a second primary cancer (SPC).Patients and Methods We identified 14,181 men with a first cancer from the National Health Insurance Corporation Study cohort. We obtained data on fasting glucose level, body mass index (BMI), and smoking history from an enrollment interview (1996). We obtained SPC incidence data for 1996 through 2002 from the Korean Central Cancer Registry. We used the standard Poisson regression model to estimate the age-and multivariate-adjusted relative risk (RR) for SPCs in relation to smoking history, BMI, and insulin resistance before diagnosis.Results We observed 204 patients with SPC. The overall age-standardized incidence rate of SPC was 603.2 occurrences per 100,000 person-years, which was about 2.3 times higher than that of first cancer in the general male population. Multivariate regression revealed that lung (RR, 3.69; 95% Cl, 1.35 to 10.09) and smoking-related (RR, 2.02; 95% Cl, 1.02 to 4.03) SPCs were significantly associated with smoking. Obese patients (BMI >= 25 kg/m(2)) had significantly elevated RRs for colorectal (RR, 3.45; 95% Cl, 1.50 to 7.93) and genitourinary (RR, 3.61; 95% Cl, 1.36 to 9.54) SPCs. Patients with a fasting serum glucose concentration >= 126 mg/dL had a higher RR for hepatopancreatobiliary (RR, 3.33; 95% Cl, 1.33 to 8.37) and smoking-related (1.93; 95% Cl, 1.01 to 3.68) SPCs.Conclusion Prediagnosis smoking history, obesity, and insulin resistance were risk factors for several SPCs. These findings suggest that more thorough surveillance and screening for SPCs is needed for the cancer survivors with these risk factors.
ISSN
0732-183X
Language
English
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10371/81799
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2006.10.3416
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.
Appears in Collections:
College of Medicine/School of Medicine (의과대학/대학원)Dept. of Medicine (의학과)Journal Papers (저널논문_의학과)
  • mendeley

Items in S-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Browse