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Critical Juncture and Nuclear-Power Dependence in Japan: A Historical Institutionalist Analysis

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Authors
Kim, Sung Chull
Issue Date
2013
Publisher
The Institute for Peace and Unification Studies, Seoul National University
Citation
Asian Journal of Peacebuilding, Vol.1 No.1, pp. 87-108
Keywords
nuclear powerinstitutionactorsspirit of peaceful usefull nuclear fuel cycle
Abstract
The institution of nuclear power in Japan appears to be drifting; nevertheless it persists. For the past 60 years, conservative politicians, technologists, and electric companies have acted in concert, for different reasons, to achieve a full nuclear fuel cycle: specifically technology for reprocessing and uranium enrichment. Their pursuit has eroded the bottom-line spirit of peaceful use; to be sure, it has been excessively ambitious for Japans status as a non-nuclear-weapon state. The mastering of the full nuclear fuel cycle has resulted in a competency trap, excluding or delaying development of alternatives to nuclear power. Furthermore, this situation has heightened nuclear powers sunk costs. The critical conjuncture of the March 11, 2011 incident has had a limited impact only. Anti-nuclear activists, the weakest concerned actor, try to dramatize their movement for exit from nuclear, but they have failed to bring about electoral changes.
ISSN
2288-2693 (print)
2288-2707 (online)
Language
English
URI
https://hdl.handle.net/10371/83423
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Researcher Institutes (연구소)Institute for Peace and Unification Studies (통일평화연구원)Asian Journal of PeacebuildingAsian Journal of Peacebuilding vol.01 no.01/02 (2013)
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