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다수의 위협에 대한 정책결정자들의 인식 과정 분석: 1933-1941년 미국의 선 독일 후 일본 원칙의 사례
Study of Threat Perception in Decision Making Process: A Case of 'Germany First' Strategy

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Authors
조재원
Issue Date
2013
Publisher
서울대학교 미국학연구소
Citation
미국학, Vol.36 No.1, pp. 115-152
Keywords
‘선 독일 후 일본 원칙’ (Germany First Strategy)위협인식(threat perception)F. 루즈벨트 (F. Roosevelt)인종적 선입관 (racial preconception)
Abstract
This research is a case study that analyses the determining causes of Germany First strategy of the U. S which was the major war plan during the Second World War. As stated in the title, Germany First strategy refers to a war plan that, with a cooperation of the allied powers which Great Britain was a representative figure, prioritized Germany as a first enemy to defeat, and to deal with Japanese threat later with fully concentrated military strength. The research analyses and attempts to prove that the perceptions of decision makers had a decisive effect on decision making process instead of the level ofmilitary power of threatening nations. Along with this, the research analyses threat perception based on the study of national image. It is certain that, to Roosevelt and key decision makers, both Germany and Japan were regarded as nations threatening the value of liberty and democracy. However, due to the racial preconception, Japan was perceived as a traditionally untrustworthy nation obsessed with the delusion of militarism and imperialism; in addition, racial preconception as an inferior Asian made underestimate the actual level of the threat. Because Japanese threat is underestimated, a wishful thinking that Japan would wait until the war with Germany is over prevailed among the decision makers and thereby allowed to established Germany First strategy.
ISSN
1229-4381
Language
Korean
URI
https://hdl.handle.net/10371/88709
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Researcher Institutes (연구소, 연구원)American Studies Institute (미국학연구소)미국학미국학 Volume 36 Number 1/2 (2013)
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