Browse

일본 TV 영상물의 재일제주인 표상
Koreans of the Jeju Origin Living in Japan : As Represented in the Post-war Japanese Television Media

Cited 0 time in Web of Science Cited 0 time in Scopus
Authors
양인실
Issue Date
2013-03-15
Publisher
서울대학교 일본연구소
Citation
일본비평, Vol.8, pp. 80-117
Keywords
Koreans in Japan from Jejutelevision documantariessmugglingrefugeeidentitymulticulturalismJeju 4.3 Massacre재일제주인텔레비전 다큐멘터리밀항난민아이덴티티다문화주의제주4·3사건
Abstract
최근 한국과 일본의 학계에서는 재일제주인이라는 단어를 쉽게 찾아볼 수 있다. 특히 제주도와 오사카의 지역방송국을 중심으로 재일제주인을 중심으로 한 특집 다큐멘터리나 드라마가 많이 제작되고 있다. 이들 최근의 드라마나 다큐멘터리는 재일제주인을 재현하면서 주로 밀항, 불법체류, 오사카 시 이쿠노쿠, 난민 신청, 재일외국인들 간의 사랑이라는 요소를 다룬다. 그런데 한국과 일본사이에서 밀항이 급증하던 1965년을 전후한 시기에 만들어진 다큐멘터리에도 오사카 시 이쿠노쿠를 중심으로 밀항과 불법체류, 난민 신청이 중심이 되어 재일제주인 문제가 다루어지는 작품을 찾아볼 수 있다. 이 연구에서는 방송에서 재일제주인이 다루어질 때 반드시 나오는 제주4・3사건, 밀항, 다른 재일조선인들과는 다른 방식의 고향에 대한 향수 등을 들어, 각 방송 프로그램에서 재일제주인들이 어떻게 재현되고 있는지에 대해 시대별로 살펴보았다. 우선 1960년대 영상물은 재일제주인들이 4・3사건과 한국전쟁을 겪으면서 일본으로 왔고, 그 과정에서 밀항이라는 수단을 선택했으며, 불법체류자로 일본에 살면서 잘못된 선택을 했다는 걸 강조하면서도 가족애와 미담의 대상으로 재일제주인을 선택하기도 했다. 그러나 최근 재일제주인 1세 여성들을 다룬 텔레비전 다큐멘터리에서는 재일제주인 여성으로서의 삶과 굴곡이 잘 표현되어 있지만, 한편으로는 영화화되는 과정에서 역사와 맥락이 삭제되기도 했다. 또한 재일제주인 3세나 4세가 주인공이 되면 이들의 관심은 정치나 역사보다는 한국의 문화로 옮겨가게 되는데, 여기에서 재일제주인 1세와 2세들의 밀항의 기억은 이들을 연결하는 키워드가 된다. 그리고 재일조선인들을 등장시키는 일본의 많은 영상 텍스트들이 재일조선인 1세와 3세를 아이덴티티에 대한 고뇌로 연결하고, 2세를 타자화해 왔다면, 최근의 영상 텍스트는 2세들에게 여유을 가지고 자신의 삶과 뿌리에 대해 생각해 보라는 문제제기를 한다는 점에 그 차이가 있다. 그러나 이런 부분이 기존의 텍스트와는 다르게 재일조선인을 다룬 영상물, 특히 재일제주인을 다룬 영상물들이 발전하고 있음을 보여주지만 미래에 대해서는 낙관적이지만 과거에 대해서는 입을 다물어온 일본의 다문화주의를 여전히 답습하고 있다고도 볼 수 있다.

In recent years, the term Koreans in Japan from Jeju (zainichi jejujin) has grown popular in the academia of both Japan and South Korea. Also, a number of TV dramas and documentaries on Koreans from Jeju living in Japan have been aired over the last few years, led by local broadcasting stations in the Jeju Island and in Osaka. These TV dramas and documentaries often take up themes such as the Jeju people smuggling themselves into Japan, their illegal residence in Japan, their attempt to apply for the refugee status; at the same time, they also deal with themes such as romance with other foreign residents in Japan, or life in the Ikuno community in Osaka (where Koreans from Jeju are concentrated in), which symbolically speaks for this group. In fact, these same themes can be found in the television documentaries made around 1965, the period when the number of illegal migration from South Korea to Japan was rapidly increasing. In this study, I discuss how these television programs have represented Koreans from Jeju in accordance with the changes in different time periods, by observing how each media depicted the Jeju 4.3 Massacre, the Jeju peoples smuggling themselves into Japan, and their nostalgia for their homeland Jeju, which reveals to be different from their fellow Koreans living in Japan from different parts of Korea. These are recurring themes in the visual media where Koreans of the Jeju-origin living in Japan appear. For instance, the television texts of the 1960s use Koreans from Jeju living in Japan as subjects of heart-warming story based on familial love, while emphasizing their (direct or indirect) experiences of having crossed over to Japan after surviving the Jeju 4.3 Massacre and the Korean War, their life as illegal residents, and their feelings of regret for having made the wrong choice of becoming illegal residents as ex-patriots. Although recent documentaries about the first generation Korean women from Jeju present their lives as full of twists and turns, such historical contexts are often deleted when adapted to the screen. In cases where Koreans of the third or fourth immigrant generations play central characters, politics becomes their main concern, and memories possessed by the first and second immigrant generations smuggling themselves into Japan from Jeju become a lynchpin that connects them to their descendant generations. Moreover, while many visual texts on Koreans living in Japan in general, who have come from regions other than Jeju, tend to emphasize the ethnic identity of the first and third immigrant generations as that of zainichi Koreans (Koreans residing in Japan), such texts often present the second generation as Others in the story. On the contrary, visual texts on Koreans of the Jeji origin differ from such visual texts in that they try to help the second generation Koreans from Jeju build up their confidence about their ethnic origin and roots. However, even though films on Koreans living in Japan have become increasingly diversified in terms of themes, especially those films on Koreans from Jeju, these texts still seem to be reproducing the discourse of the Japanese multiculturalism, which presents an unrealistically hopeful future while silencing the past.
ISSN
2092-6863
Language
Korean
URI
https://hdl.handle.net/10371/92056
Files in This Item:
Appears in Collections:
Graduate School of International Studies (국제대학원)Institute for Japanese Studies(일본연구소)일본비평(Korean Journal of Japanese Studies)일본비평(Korean Journal of Japanese Studies) Volume 08 (2013. 03.)
  • mendeley

Items in S-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Browse