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A multi-institutional study of the prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 large genomic rearrangements in familial breast cancer patients

Cited 18 time in Web of Science Cited 17 time in Scopus
Authors
Seong, Moon-Woo; Cho, Sung Im; Kim, Kyu Hyung; Chung, Il Yong; Kang, Eunyoung; Lee, Jong Won; Park, Sue K; Lee, Min Hyuk; Choi, Doo Ho; Yom, Cha Kyong; Noh, Woo-Chul; Chang, Myung Chul; Park, Sung Sup; Kim, Sung-Won
Issue Date
2014-09-01
Publisher
BioMed Central
Citation
BMC Cancer, 14:645
Keywords
Breast cancerHereditary cancerLarge genomic rearrangementBRCA1BRCA2
Abstract
Background: Large genomic rearrangements (LGRs) in the BRCA1/2 genes are frequently observed in breast cancer patients who are negative for BRCA1/2 small mutations. Here, we examined 221 familial breast cancer patients from 37 hospitals to estimate the contribution of LGRs, in a nationwide context, to the development of breast cancer.
Methods: Direct sequencing or mutation scanning followed by direct sequencing was performed to screen small mutations. BRCA1/2 small mutation-negative patients were screened for the presence of LGRs using a multiple ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assay.
Results: Using a combined strategy to detect the presence of small mutations and LGRs, we identified BRCA1/2 small mutations in 78 (35.3%) out of 221 familial breast cancer patients and BRCA1 LGRs in 3 (2.1%) out of 143 BRCA1/2 small mutation-negative patients: the deletion of exons 11–13, the deletion of exons 13–15, and whole gene deletion of exons 1-24. The novel deletion of exons 11–13 is thought to result from a non-homologous recombination event mediated by a microhomology sequence comprised of 3 or 4 base pairs: c.3416_4357 + 1863delins187 (NG_005905.2: g.33369_44944delins187).
Conclusions: In this study, we showed that LGRs were found in 3.7% (3/81) of the patients who had mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2, and 7.5% (3/40) of patients with mutations in BRCA1. This suggests that the contribution of LGRs to familial breast cancer in this population might be comparable to that in other ethnic populations. Given these findings, an MLPA to screen for mutations in the BRCA1 gene is recommended as an initial screening test in highly selective settings.
Language
English
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10371/93133
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2407-14-645
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College of Medicine/School of Medicine (의과대학/대학원)Surgery (외과학전공)Journal Papers (저널논문_외과학전공)
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