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Genetic and baseline metabolic factors for incident diabetes and HbA(1c) at follow-up: the healthy twin study

Cited 2 time in Web of Science Cited 5 time in Scopus
Authors
Sung, Joohon; Lee, Kayoung; Song, Yun-Mi; Lee, Mikyeong; Kim, Jina
Issue Date
2014
Publisher
Wiley
Citation
Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews, vol.31, pp. 376-384
Keywords
diabetes mellitusquantitative heritable traitsrisk factorstwin and
family study
Abstract
Background We investigated baseline anthropometric/metabolic traits
predicting incident diabetes, genetic/environmental relationships between
these traits and HbA1c at follow-up and the contribution of genetics, covariates
and environments to variance in HbA1c at follow-up and incident diabetes.
Methods Nondiabetic twins (n=869) and their family members (n=949)
were followed over 3.7±1.4 years (44.3±12.8 years of age); baseline
anthropometric/metabolic traits were measured. Fasting plasma glucose
and HbA1c were measured at follow-up. Incident diabetes was defined as
HbA1c ≥6.5% or fasting plasma glucose ≥7 mmol/L.
Results Age-adjusted incident diabetes was 4.9% in men and 4.1% in
women. Odd ratio for incident diabetes was 2.34–2.40, 1.25-1.28, 1.22–1.27
and 1.89 per standard deviation of baseline fasting plasma glucose, white blood
cell (WBC), triglycerides and waist circumference, respectively, in multivariate
generalized estimating equation models (p<0.05). Age-adjusted and sexadjusted
heritability was 0.85 for diabetes and 0.72 for HbA1c. In bivariate
analyses adjusted for age, sex and body mass index at baseline, HbA1c at
follow-up showed significant genetic and environmental correlations with
baseline glucose (0.44, 0.17), significant genetic correlation with baseline waist
circumference (0.16) and triglycerides (0.30) and significant environmental
correlation with baseline WBC (0.09). Variance in HbA1c at follow-up and incident
diabetes was explained by genetics (33% and 28%, respectively), covariates
(36% and 48%, respectively), shared environments (7% and 0%,
respectively) and errors (24% and 24%, respectively).
Conclusions High values for baseline fasting plasma glucose, WBC, triglycerides
and waist circumference are independent risk factors for incident diabetes.
While genetic influences strongly contribute to variance in HbA1c at
follow-up and incident diabetes, these risk factors significantly contribute to
the remaining variance.
Language
English
URI
https://hdl.handle.net/10371/94766
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1002/dmrr.2619
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Graduate School of Public Health (보건대학원)Dept. of Public Health (보건학과)Journal Papers (저널논문_보건학과)
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