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Factors related with colorectal and stomach cancer screening practice among disease-free lung cancer survivors in Korea

Cited 1 time in Web of Science Cited 2 time in Scopus
Authors
Park, Sang Min; Lee, Jongmog; Kim, Young Ae; Chang, Yoon Jung; Kim, Moon Soo; Shim, Young Mog; Zo, Jae Ill; Yun, Young Ho
Issue Date
2017-08-30
Publisher
BioMed Central
Citation
BMC Cancer, 17(1):600
Keywords
Colorectal cancer screeningStomach cancer screeningLung cancer survivorPhysician recommendation
Description
This research was supported by a grant from the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF), which is funded by the Korean government (MEST, grant no.2015M2A2A7055063); a grant of the Korean Health Technology R&D Project, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Republic of Korea (H14C3459); and the National R&D Program through the Dong-nam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (DIRAMS) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science, and Technology (50595–2016). The funding bodies had no role in the design of the study and collection, analysis, and interpretation of data and in writing the manuscript.
Abstract
Abstract

Background
Lung cancer survivors are more likely to develop colorectal and stomach cancer than the general population. However, little is known about the current status of gastrointestinal cancer screening practices and related factors among lung cancer survivors.

Methods
We enrolled 829 disease-free lung cancer survivors ≥40 years of age, who had been treated at two hospitals from 2001 to 2006. The patients completed a questionnaire that included stomach and colorectal cancer screening after lung cancer treatment, as well as other sociodemographic variables.

Results
Among lung cancer survivors, correlations with stomach and colorectal screening recommendations were 22.7 and 25.8%, respectively. Of these, 40.7% reported receiving physician advice to screen for second primary cancer (SPC). Those who were recommended for further screening for other cancers were more likely to receive stomach cancer screening [adjusted odds ratios (aOR) = 1.63, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.16–2.30] and colorectal cancer screening [aOR = 1.37, 95% CI, 0.99–1.90]. Less-educated lung cancer survivors were less likely to have stomach and colorectal cancer screenings.

Conclusions
Lack of a physician’s advice for SPC screening and lower educational status had negative impact on the gastrointestinal cancer screening rates of lung cancer survivors.
ISSN
1471-2407
Language
English
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10371/138282
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1186/s12885-017-3583-z
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College of Medicine/School of Medicine (의과대학/대학원)Dept. of Biomedical Sciences (대학원 의과학과)Journal Papers (저널논문_의과학과)
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