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탈골된 문법과 다시 쓰는 역사 : 미국시의 지평에
History Rewritten in Dislocated Grammar:Exploring Cultural Politics of Korean-American Poetry

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Authors
정은귀
Issue Date
2006
Publisher
서울대학교 인문대학 인문학연구원
Citation
인문논총, Vol.55, pp. 107-138
Keywords
탈골된 문법문화 정치학역사표준화대안적 재현 형식하이픈
Abstract
Although the politics of identity intertwined with gender, ethnicity, and
nationality have often been celebrated as a means of reading Korean-American
writers, the role of the experiment in language has yet to be explained. Focusing
on select works by Theresa Hak Kyung Cha and Myung Mi Kim, two
representative Korean-American poets, this essay evaluates the form of
dislocated grammar as a way of representing history and furthermore repositions
their experimental poetics within the contemporary landscape of American
poetry, not as a form of alienation but as a form of constellation.
For second-or third-language writers such as Cha and Kim, and others, the
stylization of multiple languages and the decapitated forms are used very
directly to enhance an awareness of dis/locatedness, thus giving readers a space
to rethink cultural politics of American language. Structural and thematic
concerns will be that of finding ways of grappling with the personal relocation
and demonstrating a critique of, rather than a faith in, the politics of identity in
America. This essay, approaching the issue of language experiment and its
inaccessibility and incoherence, touches a linguistic form of cultural politics, the neglected part in Cha and Kims works and problematizes the meaning of
hyphen in the works of Korean-American poets. As writers who have been
under siege by the practice of standardization, the primary concerns of Theresa
Hak Kyung Cha and Myung Mi Kim are not just resistance, but rather finding a
channel for the intersection of language as a site of possibility in America. The
literary forms of dislocated grammar alerts us to the existence of alternative
histories but also alternative forms of its representation. Diaspora as it is figured
in these works is not in any way associated with an essential ethnic identity.
Rather, it is something transnational that communicates across boundaries, requestioning
the formation of national identity of America.
ISSN
1598-3021
Language
Korean
URI
https://hdl.handle.net/10371/29645
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College of Humanities (인문대학)Institute of Humanities (인문학연구원)Journal of humanities (인문논총)Journal of Humanities vol.55 (2006) (인문논총)
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