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三國時代의 跆拳道에 關한 硏究

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Authors
鄭傑謨
Issue Date
1976
Publisher
서울대학교 사범대학
Citation
사대논총, Vol.14, pp. 135-147
Abstract
The original performance of Taekwon dates historically as far back as to the remotest tribal states of Korea and found its first formal expression in the state religious rituals of Dongmaeing, Yonggo, Muchon in early Kokuryo, Pyuo, and Ye states respeclively; or Kawi of the southern state silla. Since Taekwon was believed to be effective and basic for acquiring ones physical strength and war skills in which the sword and lance were the chief weapons, these states eventually came to put more emphasis on the practice of the skill as they had grown more subject to increased chances of wars and strifes waged among themselves or with other neighbors than these Korean tribes. No wonder that, in such well-organized warrior groups as Sonbae of Kokuyro and Hwarang of silla, Taekwon was not practiced only for its own but a qualified warrior was also required to be trained through Taekwon before or along with his trainership through the sword practice. Sonbae seemed to employ Taekwon from at least the 2nd century A.D. In the 4th century it was practiced as the part of the curriculum in the Sʇate and municipal acade mies of Kokuryo called Taehak and ,Kyongdang where the classical scholarship had been taught, and by the end of the Kokuryo Dynasty when the role of Sonbae as the basis of national defence was vital and decisive, Taekwon came to be considered to bear directly upon the national spirit and military morale, for now is gained popularity and was fully developed into a general form of state athletics. Such circumstances were fundamentally the same with Silla, where Taekwonand been introduced from Kokuryo at an earlier time and moved remarkably fast. toward its perfection by refining the skill and attributing spiritual significance to the practice. It is very interesting that Taekwon occasionally influenced Buddism-based carvings and statues, which more often than not represented the Taekwon man in action or various postures originated from it. Since it was character of Silla that Buddism was strongly intermingled with patriotism, it would not be very strange that some of Buddism-oriented armed genii(large statues of In Wang and 'Keum Kang the Mighty) were obviously motivated by the Pooms(patterns) of Taekwon. These statues and carvings show that a full course practice of Taekwon included three different phases of basic skill, training pattern and mathches, which arethe same divisions of modern Taekwon'. In short Taekwon practice in Silla appears to have surpassed that of Kokuryo.
ISSN
1226-4636
Language
Korean
URI
https://hdl.handle.net/10371/72674
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College of Education (사범대학)Center for Educational Research (교육종합연구원)교육연구와 실천Journal of the College of Education (師大論叢) vol.13/14 (1976)
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