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내림무당의 쇠乞粒 : 東北亞細亞 샤머니즘과 韓國巫俗과의 比較硏究①
Brassware Contribution to the Shamans Instruments in the Initiation Rite

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Authors
李杜鉉
Issue Date
1986
Publisher
서울대학교 사범대학
Citation
사대논총, Vol.34, pp. 75-104
Abstract
This paper studies the initiating process of a possessed female shaman called Kum-Hwa Kim from Hwanghae province(the North-West part of Korea), with particular focus on her clients' brassware contribution to her shamanistic instruments. It aims to analyze the ethnography of the shamanistic complex in Hwanghae province and to compare Korean shamanism with that of Siberia, North-East Asia and Eastern Asia by examining extant shamanistic instruments such as the mirror, sword and bell. In comparing the shamanism in these various regions, this study prefers to make use of concrete instruments, ethnographic data, historical data and archaeological specimens rather than deal in theoretical assumptions. The comparison shows striking similarities among these regional shamanisms. One interesting finding of this study is the resemblance of the Japanese 'Amano-iwaya-do' myth and the Korean shamanistic rite 'Ilwŏl-maji Kut'. It is recorded in the Japanese 'Kojiki' and 'Nihon-shoki' that the shamanistic rite was performed in front of 'Amanoiwaya' by many gods to please the sun goddess, 'Amaterasu", and was succeeded in presenting the sun goddess from the cave. This rite is comparable to 'Ilwŏl-maji Kut', the Sun-and-Moon-greeting rite, of the Hwanghae province and the eastern coast. In addition, it is argued, that the use of the Korean shamanistic mirror and sword was influenced by the Taoistic folk belief of ancient China. Especially, the use of sword shows the possibility of the close relation to Dumézils 'Three Functions' paradigm(i.e., the belief that the ancient king in the Indo-European race had three functions: priest, warrior and cultivator). The foundation myths of the Old Korean Kingdoms also show a close relation to Dumézil's paradigm. This relationship is further examined via the hereditary shaman and the blacksmith in the southern part of Korea.
ISSN
1226-4636
Language
Korean
URI
https://hdl.handle.net/10371/72817
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College of Education (사범대학)Center for Educational Research (교육종합연구원)교육연구와 실천Journal of the College of Education (師大論叢) vol.34/35 (1987)
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