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ALTERED FUNCTIONAL CONNECTIVITY IN SUBJECTS WITH ULTRA-HIGH RISK FOR PSYCHOSIS USING RESTING STATE FMRI

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Authors
Kwon, Jun Soo; Shim, Geumsook; Oh, Jungsu S.; Jung, Wi Hoon; Choi, Chi-Hoon; Park, Hye-Yoon; Jung, Myung Hun; Choi, Jung-Seok; Kim, Euitae; Jang, Joon Hwan
Issue Date
2010-04
Publisher
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV
Citation
SCHIZOPHRENIA RESEARCH; Vol.117 2-3; 348-349
Abstract
Background: Several functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)
studies of schizophrenia have revealed the default mode network
(DMN) and task-related network (TRN) abnormalities during resting-state. Midline default network areas, including the medial
prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulate cortex, are implicated in
self-referential and social cognitive tasks, and individuals at ultrahigh
risk (UHR) for psychosis were recently reported to have selfdisturbances
and deficits in social cognition and functioning. Thus,
the DMN has its potential to reveal the neural substrates of selfreferential
and social cognitive information processing in UHR
subjects. In this study, we investigated resting-state DMN and TRN
functional connectivity in UHR subjects and healthy controls.
Methods: Twenty UHR subjects and 20 matched healthy controls
underwent fMRI while resting quietly. We selected bilateral
posterior cingulate cortex (Brodmann area 23) as a seed region
and reconstructed the intrinsic organization in the UHR subjects
and healthy controls on the basis of fMRI time series correlation
(also known as functional connectivity). Between-group comparison
of the DMN and TRN was restricted to regions belonging to the
intrinsic networks of control group. Additionally, we also conducted
between-group region of interest (ROI)-based connectivity analyses
on areas in which UHR subjects showed altered connectivities,
within a priori selected anatomical ROIs.
Results: Default mode and task-related areas were observed in
regions previously associated with the DMN and TRN for both
groups. Default mode areas included the posterior/anterior cingulate,
medial prefrontal and lateral parietal cortices, and inferior/
superior temporal gyri, whereas task-related areas included the
dorsolateral prefrontal and middle temporal cortex, supplementary
motor area, and frontal eye field. Compared to healthy controls, UHR
subjects exhibited hyperconnectivity within the default network
regions and reduced anti-correlations between the posterior
cingulate cortex and task-related areas. Between-group ROI analysis
also confirmed these findings.
Discussion: Our findings suggest that abnormal hyperconnectivity
of the default areas in UHR subjects might be related with clinical
features of UHR subjects like disturbance of self-perception and
heightened social anxiety. Neurodevelopmental and anatomical
alterations of cortical midline structure might underlie altered
intrinsic networks in UHR subjects. We also speculate that reduced
anti-correlation between two networks might be related with
impaired neurocognitive function in UHR subjects, which might be
mediated by weaker task-induced deactivation of the DMN.
ISSN
0920-9964
Language
English
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10371/78393
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2010.02.610
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Appears in Collections:
College of Medicine/School of Medicine (의과대학/대학원)Psychiatry (정신과학전공)Journal Papers (저널논문_정신과학전공)
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